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Spinally projecting preproglucagon axons preferentially innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons.

Llewellyn-Smith IJ, Marina N, Manton RN, Reimann F, Gribble FM, Trapp S - Neuroscience (2014)

Bottom Line: These results show that brainstem PPG neurons innervate spinal autonomic and somatic motor neurons.SPN receive the densest PPG innervation.Brainstem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to SPN or interneurons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Medicine, Physiology and Centre for Neuroscience, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

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YFP-immunoreactive innervation of parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPN). Two-color immunoperoxidase staining for YFP (black) and ChAT (brown) in a horizontal section through the lumbosacral (L6-S1) spinal cord. (A) The sacral parasympathetic nucleus (PN) is sparsely innervated by black YFP-immunoreactive axons. Of the 133 PPN in A, black YFP-positive axon terminals closely appose only 29 of the brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN, some of which are indicated by arrows. Arrows B-E mark neurons that are shown at higher magnification in B–E. Black, non-varicose YFP-immunoreactive axons run rostrocaudally through the white matter of the lateral funiculus (LF). Asterisks indicate the lateral edge of the spinal cord. Montage of 6 micrographs. Scale bar: 100 μm. (B–F) Brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN receive close appositions (arrows) from black YFP-immunoreactive varicosities. Micrographs in montages: B, 4; C, 3; D and E, 2; F, 6. Scale bars: 10 μm. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
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f0030: YFP-immunoreactive innervation of parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPN). Two-color immunoperoxidase staining for YFP (black) and ChAT (brown) in a horizontal section through the lumbosacral (L6-S1) spinal cord. (A) The sacral parasympathetic nucleus (PN) is sparsely innervated by black YFP-immunoreactive axons. Of the 133 PPN in A, black YFP-positive axon terminals closely appose only 29 of the brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN, some of which are indicated by arrows. Arrows B-E mark neurons that are shown at higher magnification in B–E. Black, non-varicose YFP-immunoreactive axons run rostrocaudally through the white matter of the lateral funiculus (LF). Asterisks indicate the lateral edge of the spinal cord. Montage of 6 micrographs. Scale bar: 100 μm. (B–F) Brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN receive close appositions (arrows) from black YFP-immunoreactive varicosities. Micrographs in montages: B, 4; C, 3; D and E, 2; F, 6. Scale bars: 10 μm. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

Mentions: Varicose YFP-containing axons had clearly delineated varicosities and fine intervaricose segments (Figs. 4–9). Some of the axons had large varicosities; others had small fine varicosities and some axons had both large and small varicosities (e.g., Figs. 6B, C and 7E). All three types of axons made close appositions on immunohistochemically identified spinal neurons. In segments T1–L2 (Figs. 4 and 5), which contain SPN, many varicose, YFP-immunoreactive axons traveled rostrocaudally along the IML and mediolaterally between the IML and the intercalated nucleus (ICN). There was also a dense plexus of varicose axons containing YFP-immunoreactivity that ran rostrocaudally through the dorsal portion of lamina X, the location of SPN cell bodies in the spinal autonomic subnucleus called the central autonomic area (CAA). Smaller numbers of varicose YFP-positive axons occurred through lamina VII and in laminae VIII and IX; areas containing limb motor neurons (Figs. 4D and 7). There were fewer immunoreactive axons in laminae IV and V than in laminae containing autonomic and somatic motor neurons (Fig. 4A, E). The number of YFP-containing axons decreased from lamina IV to lamina II, where there were almost no YFP-immunoreactive axons. YFP-positive axons were never found in lamina I.


Spinally projecting preproglucagon axons preferentially innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons.

Llewellyn-Smith IJ, Marina N, Manton RN, Reimann F, Gribble FM, Trapp S - Neuroscience (2014)

YFP-immunoreactive innervation of parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPN). Two-color immunoperoxidase staining for YFP (black) and ChAT (brown) in a horizontal section through the lumbosacral (L6-S1) spinal cord. (A) The sacral parasympathetic nucleus (PN) is sparsely innervated by black YFP-immunoreactive axons. Of the 133 PPN in A, black YFP-positive axon terminals closely appose only 29 of the brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN, some of which are indicated by arrows. Arrows B-E mark neurons that are shown at higher magnification in B–E. Black, non-varicose YFP-immunoreactive axons run rostrocaudally through the white matter of the lateral funiculus (LF). Asterisks indicate the lateral edge of the spinal cord. Montage of 6 micrographs. Scale bar: 100 μm. (B–F) Brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN receive close appositions (arrows) from black YFP-immunoreactive varicosities. Micrographs in montages: B, 4; C, 3; D and E, 2; F, 6. Scale bars: 10 μm. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300405&req=5

f0030: YFP-immunoreactive innervation of parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPN). Two-color immunoperoxidase staining for YFP (black) and ChAT (brown) in a horizontal section through the lumbosacral (L6-S1) spinal cord. (A) The sacral parasympathetic nucleus (PN) is sparsely innervated by black YFP-immunoreactive axons. Of the 133 PPN in A, black YFP-positive axon terminals closely appose only 29 of the brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN, some of which are indicated by arrows. Arrows B-E mark neurons that are shown at higher magnification in B–E. Black, non-varicose YFP-immunoreactive axons run rostrocaudally through the white matter of the lateral funiculus (LF). Asterisks indicate the lateral edge of the spinal cord. Montage of 6 micrographs. Scale bar: 100 μm. (B–F) Brown ChAT-immunoreactive PPN receive close appositions (arrows) from black YFP-immunoreactive varicosities. Micrographs in montages: B, 4; C, 3; D and E, 2; F, 6. Scale bars: 10 μm. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
Mentions: Varicose YFP-containing axons had clearly delineated varicosities and fine intervaricose segments (Figs. 4–9). Some of the axons had large varicosities; others had small fine varicosities and some axons had both large and small varicosities (e.g., Figs. 6B, C and 7E). All three types of axons made close appositions on immunohistochemically identified spinal neurons. In segments T1–L2 (Figs. 4 and 5), which contain SPN, many varicose, YFP-immunoreactive axons traveled rostrocaudally along the IML and mediolaterally between the IML and the intercalated nucleus (ICN). There was also a dense plexus of varicose axons containing YFP-immunoreactivity that ran rostrocaudally through the dorsal portion of lamina X, the location of SPN cell bodies in the spinal autonomic subnucleus called the central autonomic area (CAA). Smaller numbers of varicose YFP-positive axons occurred through lamina VII and in laminae VIII and IX; areas containing limb motor neurons (Figs. 4D and 7). There were fewer immunoreactive axons in laminae IV and V than in laminae containing autonomic and somatic motor neurons (Fig. 4A, E). The number of YFP-containing axons decreased from lamina IV to lamina II, where there were almost no YFP-immunoreactive axons. YFP-positive axons were never found in lamina I.

Bottom Line: These results show that brainstem PPG neurons innervate spinal autonomic and somatic motor neurons.SPN receive the densest PPG innervation.Brainstem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to SPN or interneurons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Medicine, Physiology and Centre for Neuroscience, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus