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Experimental final hosts of Metagonimus hakubaensis (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) and their suitability to the fluke.

Kudo N, Ota C, Saka F, Ikeda Y, Tomihisa Y, Itoi Y, Oyamada T - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Seven laboratory mammal and bird species were orally inoculated with 200-1,000 encysted Metagonimus hakubaensis metacercariae that had been isolated from naturally infected lampreys (Lethenteron reissneri) captured in Aomori Prefecture.Recovery rates of the fluke were higher in dogs and hamsters than in cats, rats, mice, chickens and quails.These results indicate that the suitability of dogs and hamsters for M. hakubaensis infection is higher than that of the other laboratory animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Seven laboratory mammal and bird species were orally inoculated with 200-1,000 encysted Metagonimus hakubaensis metacercariae that had been isolated from naturally infected lampreys (Lethenteron reissneri) captured in Aomori Prefecture. At 8 and 15 days post-infection, adult flukes were recovered from all of the laboratory animals tested, and therefore, hamster, rat, mouse, dog, cat, chicken and quail were considered as final hosts of M. hakubaensis. Recovery rates of the fluke were higher in dogs and hamsters than in cats, rats, mice, chickens and quails. The flukes recovered from dogs and hamsters showed increased body length and higher fecundity than those recovered from the other hosts. These results indicate that the suitability of dogs and hamsters for M. hakubaensis infection is higher than that of the other laboratory animals.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adult flukes of Metagonimus hakubaensis recovered from experimentallyinfected (A) dog, (B) hamster, (C) mouse and (D) quail at 15 days post-infection.Bar=100 µm.
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fig_002: Adult flukes of Metagonimus hakubaensis recovered from experimentallyinfected (A) dog, (B) hamster, (C) mouse and (D) quail at 15 days post-infection.Bar=100 µm.

Mentions: *All measurements are given in μm, †Mean ± standard deviation.


Experimental final hosts of Metagonimus hakubaensis (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) and their suitability to the fluke.

Kudo N, Ota C, Saka F, Ikeda Y, Tomihisa Y, Itoi Y, Oyamada T - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2014)

Adult flukes of Metagonimus hakubaensis recovered from experimentallyinfected (A) dog, (B) hamster, (C) mouse and (D) quail at 15 days post-infection.Bar=100 µm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300384&req=5

fig_002: Adult flukes of Metagonimus hakubaensis recovered from experimentallyinfected (A) dog, (B) hamster, (C) mouse and (D) quail at 15 days post-infection.Bar=100 µm.
Mentions: *All measurements are given in μm, †Mean ± standard deviation.

Bottom Line: Seven laboratory mammal and bird species were orally inoculated with 200-1,000 encysted Metagonimus hakubaensis metacercariae that had been isolated from naturally infected lampreys (Lethenteron reissneri) captured in Aomori Prefecture.Recovery rates of the fluke were higher in dogs and hamsters than in cats, rats, mice, chickens and quails.These results indicate that the suitability of dogs and hamsters for M. hakubaensis infection is higher than that of the other laboratory animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Seven laboratory mammal and bird species were orally inoculated with 200-1,000 encysted Metagonimus hakubaensis metacercariae that had been isolated from naturally infected lampreys (Lethenteron reissneri) captured in Aomori Prefecture. At 8 and 15 days post-infection, adult flukes were recovered from all of the laboratory animals tested, and therefore, hamster, rat, mouse, dog, cat, chicken and quail were considered as final hosts of M. hakubaensis. Recovery rates of the fluke were higher in dogs and hamsters than in cats, rats, mice, chickens and quails. The flukes recovered from dogs and hamsters showed increased body length and higher fecundity than those recovered from the other hosts. These results indicate that the suitability of dogs and hamsters for M. hakubaensis infection is higher than that of the other laboratory animals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus