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Giant myxoid liposarcoma of descending mesocolon origin.

Uslukaya O, Taskesen F, Aliosmanoglu I, Arikanoglu Z, Gul M, Dusak A - Prz Gastroenterol (2014)

Bottom Line: They rarely exhibit intra-abdominal location.Because the symptoms emerge later on, they often remain unnoticed until they grow large.No cases at this weight and radius, originating from descending mesocolon, belonging to the myxoid sub-type, were found in our literature scan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Dicle University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Diyarbakir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Liposarcomas are one of the most common primary lesions of the retroperitoneal region. They rarely exhibit intra-abdominal location. Because the symptoms emerge later on, they often remain unnoticed until they grow large. Our aim in this paper is to present a case of myxoid liposarcoma of descending mesocolon origin, 40 cm wide and weighing 7000 g, seen in a 47-year-old male patient. No cases at this weight and radius, originating from descending mesocolon, belonging to the myxoid sub-type, were found in our literature scan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast enhanced axial (A, B), coronal (C), and sagittal (D) computerised tomography scan demonstrates the presence of a giant mass distending the abdomen and pelvis. Heterogeneously enhancing (black arrows in B) lesion placed anterior to the mesenteric vessels (arrows). Coronal image demonstrates the bowel loop (straddling sign) (arrows in C) and mesenteric fat (arrowhead in A) over the mass. Anterior compression of the renal veins and inferior vena cava (arrows in A, arrowheads in B, and arrows in D)
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Figure 0001: Contrast enhanced axial (A, B), coronal (C), and sagittal (D) computerised tomography scan demonstrates the presence of a giant mass distending the abdomen and pelvis. Heterogeneously enhancing (black arrows in B) lesion placed anterior to the mesenteric vessels (arrows). Coronal image demonstrates the bowel loop (straddling sign) (arrows in C) and mesenteric fat (arrowhead in A) over the mass. Anterior compression of the renal veins and inferior vena cava (arrows in A, arrowheads in B, and arrows in D)

Mentions: A 64-slice dynamic contrast enhanced computerised tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a 36 cm × 27 cm × 37 cm giant mass, arising in the mesentery and extending to the abdomen and pelvis, with well circumscribed planes, containing a heterogeneous hypodensity with slightly irregular enhancement that filled the entire abdominal and pelvic cavity with no metastases, and which caused anterior compression of both kidneys and compression of the inferior vena cava and renal veins and distorted the bowels. The bowel loops were distributed across the tumour between the tumour and the abdominal wall (straddling sign), due to the mesenteric location of the tumour. Finally, the CT scan also showed the presence of external impression vena cava inferior and renal veins. Based on the radiological data, the clinical diagnosis was made as mesenteric giant liposarcoma. There was a minimal amount of ascites in the Douglas’ space (Figure 1). Laboratory values and tumour markers were within normal boundaries.


Giant myxoid liposarcoma of descending mesocolon origin.

Uslukaya O, Taskesen F, Aliosmanoglu I, Arikanoglu Z, Gul M, Dusak A - Prz Gastroenterol (2014)

Contrast enhanced axial (A, B), coronal (C), and sagittal (D) computerised tomography scan demonstrates the presence of a giant mass distending the abdomen and pelvis. Heterogeneously enhancing (black arrows in B) lesion placed anterior to the mesenteric vessels (arrows). Coronal image demonstrates the bowel loop (straddling sign) (arrows in C) and mesenteric fat (arrowhead in A) over the mass. Anterior compression of the renal veins and inferior vena cava (arrows in A, arrowheads in B, and arrows in D)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4300352&req=5

Figure 0001: Contrast enhanced axial (A, B), coronal (C), and sagittal (D) computerised tomography scan demonstrates the presence of a giant mass distending the abdomen and pelvis. Heterogeneously enhancing (black arrows in B) lesion placed anterior to the mesenteric vessels (arrows). Coronal image demonstrates the bowel loop (straddling sign) (arrows in C) and mesenteric fat (arrowhead in A) over the mass. Anterior compression of the renal veins and inferior vena cava (arrows in A, arrowheads in B, and arrows in D)
Mentions: A 64-slice dynamic contrast enhanced computerised tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a 36 cm × 27 cm × 37 cm giant mass, arising in the mesentery and extending to the abdomen and pelvis, with well circumscribed planes, containing a heterogeneous hypodensity with slightly irregular enhancement that filled the entire abdominal and pelvic cavity with no metastases, and which caused anterior compression of both kidneys and compression of the inferior vena cava and renal veins and distorted the bowels. The bowel loops were distributed across the tumour between the tumour and the abdominal wall (straddling sign), due to the mesenteric location of the tumour. Finally, the CT scan also showed the presence of external impression vena cava inferior and renal veins. Based on the radiological data, the clinical diagnosis was made as mesenteric giant liposarcoma. There was a minimal amount of ascites in the Douglas’ space (Figure 1). Laboratory values and tumour markers were within normal boundaries.

Bottom Line: They rarely exhibit intra-abdominal location.Because the symptoms emerge later on, they often remain unnoticed until they grow large.No cases at this weight and radius, originating from descending mesocolon, belonging to the myxoid sub-type, were found in our literature scan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Dicle University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Diyarbakir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Liposarcomas are one of the most common primary lesions of the retroperitoneal region. They rarely exhibit intra-abdominal location. Because the symptoms emerge later on, they often remain unnoticed until they grow large. Our aim in this paper is to present a case of myxoid liposarcoma of descending mesocolon origin, 40 cm wide and weighing 7000 g, seen in a 47-year-old male patient. No cases at this weight and radius, originating from descending mesocolon, belonging to the myxoid sub-type, were found in our literature scan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus