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The Progression of Alzheimer's Disease Can Be Assessed with a Short Version of the CERAD Neuropsychological Battery: The Kuopio ALSOVA Study.

Hallikainen I, Martikainen J, Lin PJ, Cohen JT, Lahoz R, Välimäki T, Hongisto K, Väätäinen S, Vanhanen M, Neumann PJ, Hänninen T, Koivisto AM - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2014)

Bottom Line: Baseline values of the same combination predicted 37% of the CDR-sb change.A short version of the CERAD-NB subtests provides a promising and time-efficient alternative for measuring cognitive deterioration during AD follow-up.Although the initial signs of AD include memory difficulties, it may be useful to assess non-memory tasks in follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, Kuopio, Finland ; Neurology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Measuring and predicting Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression is important in order to adjust treatment and allocate care resources. We aimed to identify a combination of subtests from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Neuropsychological Battery (CERAD-NB) that best correlated with AD progression in follow-up as well as to predict AD progression.

Method: A total of 236 participants with very mild [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) = 0.5] or mild AD (CDR = 1.0) at baseline were followed up for 3 years. The CERAD-NB and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess cognition, and the CDR scale sum of boxes (CDR-sb) was employed to evaluate AD progression. Generalized estimating equations were used to develop models to predict and follow up disease progression.

Results: Performance declined on all CERAD-NB subtests. The ability of the separate subtests to distinguish between groups (baseline CDR = 0.5 or 1.0) diminished during follow-up. The best combination of subtests that explained 62% of CDR-sb variance in follow-up included verbal fluency, constructional praxis, the clock drawing test, and the MMSE. Baseline values of the same combination predicted 37% of the CDR-sb change.

Conclusion: A short version of the CERAD-NB subtests provides a promising and time-efficient alternative for measuring cognitive deterioration during AD follow-up. Although the initial signs of AD include memory difficulties, it may be useful to assess non-memory tasks in follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Progression of CERAD-NB subtest, MMSE, and CERAD-NB total scores of participants with very mild (group CDR 0.5) or mild AD (group CDR 1) at baseline during the 3-year follow-up. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group at baseline are shown.
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Figure 1: Progression of CERAD-NB subtest, MMSE, and CERAD-NB total scores of participants with very mild (group CDR 0.5) or mild AD (group CDR 1) at baseline during the 3-year follow-up. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group at baseline are shown.

Mentions: Performance on all CERAD-NB subtests declined during the 3-year follow-up period (fig. 1). At baseline, the CDR 0.5 group outperformed the CDR 1 group on the MMSE, the CERAD-NB total, the CDR-sb, and most of the CERAD-NB subtests. However, at baseline, the groups were not significantly different in their scores for naming or constructional praxis. Then, at follow-up visits 1 and 2, the groups showed significant differences in constructional praxis. At follow-up visit 3, the verbal fluency, word list learning, CERAD-NB total, and CDR-sb scores remained significantly different between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group. Throughout all the visits, the groups were distinguished by differences in verbal fluency, CERAD-NB total, and CDR-sb scores. In the CDR 1 group, word list recall, constructional praxis, and clock drawing test scores were higher at visit 3 than at visit 2.


The Progression of Alzheimer's Disease Can Be Assessed with a Short Version of the CERAD Neuropsychological Battery: The Kuopio ALSOVA Study.

Hallikainen I, Martikainen J, Lin PJ, Cohen JT, Lahoz R, Välimäki T, Hongisto K, Väätäinen S, Vanhanen M, Neumann PJ, Hänninen T, Koivisto AM - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2014)

Progression of CERAD-NB subtest, MMSE, and CERAD-NB total scores of participants with very mild (group CDR 0.5) or mild AD (group CDR 1) at baseline during the 3-year follow-up. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group at baseline are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4296232&req=5

Figure 1: Progression of CERAD-NB subtest, MMSE, and CERAD-NB total scores of participants with very mild (group CDR 0.5) or mild AD (group CDR 1) at baseline during the 3-year follow-up. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group at baseline are shown.
Mentions: Performance on all CERAD-NB subtests declined during the 3-year follow-up period (fig. 1). At baseline, the CDR 0.5 group outperformed the CDR 1 group on the MMSE, the CERAD-NB total, the CDR-sb, and most of the CERAD-NB subtests. However, at baseline, the groups were not significantly different in their scores for naming or constructional praxis. Then, at follow-up visits 1 and 2, the groups showed significant differences in constructional praxis. At follow-up visit 3, the verbal fluency, word list learning, CERAD-NB total, and CDR-sb scores remained significantly different between the CDR 0.5 and the CDR 1 group. Throughout all the visits, the groups were distinguished by differences in verbal fluency, CERAD-NB total, and CDR-sb scores. In the CDR 1 group, word list recall, constructional praxis, and clock drawing test scores were higher at visit 3 than at visit 2.

Bottom Line: Baseline values of the same combination predicted 37% of the CDR-sb change.A short version of the CERAD-NB subtests provides a promising and time-efficient alternative for measuring cognitive deterioration during AD follow-up.Although the initial signs of AD include memory difficulties, it may be useful to assess non-memory tasks in follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, Kuopio, Finland ; Neurology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Measuring and predicting Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression is important in order to adjust treatment and allocate care resources. We aimed to identify a combination of subtests from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Neuropsychological Battery (CERAD-NB) that best correlated with AD progression in follow-up as well as to predict AD progression.

Method: A total of 236 participants with very mild [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) = 0.5] or mild AD (CDR = 1.0) at baseline were followed up for 3 years. The CERAD-NB and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess cognition, and the CDR scale sum of boxes (CDR-sb) was employed to evaluate AD progression. Generalized estimating equations were used to develop models to predict and follow up disease progression.

Results: Performance declined on all CERAD-NB subtests. The ability of the separate subtests to distinguish between groups (baseline CDR = 0.5 or 1.0) diminished during follow-up. The best combination of subtests that explained 62% of CDR-sb variance in follow-up included verbal fluency, constructional praxis, the clock drawing test, and the MMSE. Baseline values of the same combination predicted 37% of the CDR-sb change.

Conclusion: A short version of the CERAD-NB subtests provides a promising and time-efficient alternative for measuring cognitive deterioration during AD follow-up. Although the initial signs of AD include memory difficulties, it may be useful to assess non-memory tasks in follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus