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The affective modulation of motor awareness in anosognosia for hemiplegia: behavioural and lesion evidence.

Besharati S, Forkel SJ, Kopelman M, Solms M, Jenkinson PM, Fotopoulou A - Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: Only the negative, emotion induction condition resulted in a significant improvement of motor awareness in anosognosic patients compared to controls; the positive emotion induction did not.Additionally, the insula, putamen and anterior periventricular white matter were associated with less awareness change following the negative emotion induction.Instead, we propose an integrative account in which insular and striatal lesions result in weak interoceptive and motivational signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, South Africa; Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, University College London, UK. Electronic address: sahba@besharati.com.

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Marginal means and interquartile range (error bars) of the change in awareness for the AHP (dark grey bars) and HP (light grey bars) groups after the positive and negative emotional induction: *p < .05. The Y-axis indicates the change in awareness scores analysed by calculating the difference in awareness scores between each condition (post minus pre) for each group. Positive scores indicate an increase in awareness (i.e., less anosognosia) and negative scores indicate a decrease in awareness (i.e., more anosognosia).
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fig1: Marginal means and interquartile range (error bars) of the change in awareness for the AHP (dark grey bars) and HP (light grey bars) groups after the positive and negative emotional induction: *p < .05. The Y-axis indicates the change in awareness scores analysed by calculating the difference in awareness scores between each condition (post minus pre) for each group. Positive scores indicate an increase in awareness (i.e., less anosognosia) and negative scores indicate a decrease in awareness (i.e., more anosognosia).

Mentions: A linear regression analysis revealed a significant main effect for the factor Group (b = 2.04, SE = −.45, p < .001, 95% CI = 1.16; 2.92), with the AHP group showing a greater change in awareness (marginal mean = .99) compared with the HP group (marginal mean = −.02). Also, a significant main effect of Emotion induction type (b = −1.07, SE = .46, p = .019, CI = −1.96; −.18) was observed, with awareness change being significantly greater following the negative (marginal mean = 1.6) compared with the positive emotional induction (marginal mean = −.57). The interaction between Emotion induction type and Group was also significant (b = −2.05, SE = .61, p = .001, CI: −3.26; −.84; see Fig. 1), with the AHP group (marginal mean = 2.55) showing a greater change in awareness compared with the HP group (marginal mean = .75) following the negative emotional induction only. Taking the HADS depression scores into account in this analysis did not change the pattern of these results.


The affective modulation of motor awareness in anosognosia for hemiplegia: behavioural and lesion evidence.

Besharati S, Forkel SJ, Kopelman M, Solms M, Jenkinson PM, Fotopoulou A - Cortex (2014)

Marginal means and interquartile range (error bars) of the change in awareness for the AHP (dark grey bars) and HP (light grey bars) groups after the positive and negative emotional induction: *p < .05. The Y-axis indicates the change in awareness scores analysed by calculating the difference in awareness scores between each condition (post minus pre) for each group. Positive scores indicate an increase in awareness (i.e., less anosognosia) and negative scores indicate a decrease in awareness (i.e., more anosognosia).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4296216&req=5

fig1: Marginal means and interquartile range (error bars) of the change in awareness for the AHP (dark grey bars) and HP (light grey bars) groups after the positive and negative emotional induction: *p < .05. The Y-axis indicates the change in awareness scores analysed by calculating the difference in awareness scores between each condition (post minus pre) for each group. Positive scores indicate an increase in awareness (i.e., less anosognosia) and negative scores indicate a decrease in awareness (i.e., more anosognosia).
Mentions: A linear regression analysis revealed a significant main effect for the factor Group (b = 2.04, SE = −.45, p < .001, 95% CI = 1.16; 2.92), with the AHP group showing a greater change in awareness (marginal mean = .99) compared with the HP group (marginal mean = −.02). Also, a significant main effect of Emotion induction type (b = −1.07, SE = .46, p = .019, CI = −1.96; −.18) was observed, with awareness change being significantly greater following the negative (marginal mean = 1.6) compared with the positive emotional induction (marginal mean = −.57). The interaction between Emotion induction type and Group was also significant (b = −2.05, SE = .61, p = .001, CI: −3.26; −.84; see Fig. 1), with the AHP group (marginal mean = 2.55) showing a greater change in awareness compared with the HP group (marginal mean = .75) following the negative emotional induction only. Taking the HADS depression scores into account in this analysis did not change the pattern of these results.

Bottom Line: Only the negative, emotion induction condition resulted in a significant improvement of motor awareness in anosognosic patients compared to controls; the positive emotion induction did not.Additionally, the insula, putamen and anterior periventricular white matter were associated with less awareness change following the negative emotion induction.Instead, we propose an integrative account in which insular and striatal lesions result in weak interoceptive and motivational signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Cape Town, South Africa; Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, University College London, UK. Electronic address: sahba@besharati.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus