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A biomechanical characterisation of acellular porcine super flexor tendons for use in anterior cruciate ligament replacement: investigation into the effects of fat reduction and bioburden reduction bioprocesses.

Herbert A, Jones GL, Ingham E, Fisher J - J Biomech (2014)

Bottom Line: The most effective of these was then carried forward into Study 2, which investigated the use of antibiotics or peracetic acid (PAA) as a bioburden reduction agent.The most severe deviations from the profile of the native tangent modulus were found to occur in Study 2 when PAA was used for bioburden reduction.Acetone was chosen as the fat reduction step whereas, antibiotics was preferable over PAA as a bioburden reduction step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: (IMBE) Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. Electronic address: A.Herbert@leeds.ac.uk.

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Experimental set-up for stress relaxation testing: (a) schematic of tissue grips including void for dry ice, (b) a decellularised specimen is processed to a dumbbell shape and (c) specimen is mounted in the grips and subjected to testing.
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f0010: Experimental set-up for stress relaxation testing: (a) schematic of tissue grips including void for dry ice, (b) a decellularised specimen is processed to a dumbbell shape and (c) specimen is mounted in the grips and subjected to testing.

Mentions: Specimens were mounted via bespoke grips (Fig. 2) to an Instron 3365 (Instron, Bucks, UK) materials testing machine equipped with a 500 N load cell. The grips were manufactured to utilise dry ice to apply the long established principles of ‘cryo-grips’ (Riemersa and Schamhardt, 1982). A probe was used to measure the temperature of the specimens at the gauge length, to ensure they had remained at room temperature and had not been adversely affected by the freezing action of the grips.


A biomechanical characterisation of acellular porcine super flexor tendons for use in anterior cruciate ligament replacement: investigation into the effects of fat reduction and bioburden reduction bioprocesses.

Herbert A, Jones GL, Ingham E, Fisher J - J Biomech (2014)

Experimental set-up for stress relaxation testing: (a) schematic of tissue grips including void for dry ice, (b) a decellularised specimen is processed to a dumbbell shape and (c) specimen is mounted in the grips and subjected to testing.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4295818&req=5

f0010: Experimental set-up for stress relaxation testing: (a) schematic of tissue grips including void for dry ice, (b) a decellularised specimen is processed to a dumbbell shape and (c) specimen is mounted in the grips and subjected to testing.
Mentions: Specimens were mounted via bespoke grips (Fig. 2) to an Instron 3365 (Instron, Bucks, UK) materials testing machine equipped with a 500 N load cell. The grips were manufactured to utilise dry ice to apply the long established principles of ‘cryo-grips’ (Riemersa and Schamhardt, 1982). A probe was used to measure the temperature of the specimens at the gauge length, to ensure they had remained at room temperature and had not been adversely affected by the freezing action of the grips.

Bottom Line: The most effective of these was then carried forward into Study 2, which investigated the use of antibiotics or peracetic acid (PAA) as a bioburden reduction agent.The most severe deviations from the profile of the native tangent modulus were found to occur in Study 2 when PAA was used for bioburden reduction.Acetone was chosen as the fat reduction step whereas, antibiotics was preferable over PAA as a bioburden reduction step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: (IMBE) Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. Electronic address: A.Herbert@leeds.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus