Limits...
The family of LSU-like proteins.

Sirko A, Wawrzyńska A, Rodríguez MC, Sęktas P - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: LSU-like proteins do not have characteristic domains that provide clues to their function.Various bioinformatic approaches have identified LSU-like proteins as important hubs for integration of signals from environmental stimuli.In this paper we review a variety of published data on LSU gene expression, the properties of lsu mutants and features of LSU-like proteins in the hope of shedding some light on their possible role in plant metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The plant response to sulfur deficiency includes extensive metabolic changes which can be monitored at various levels (transcriptome, proteome, metabolome) even before the first visible symptoms of sulfur starvation appear. Four members of the plant-specific LSU (response to Low SUlfur) gene family occur in Arabidopsis thaliana (LSU1-4). Variable numbers of LSU genes occur in other plant species but they were studied only in Arabidopsis and tobacco. Three out of four of the Arabidopsis LSU genes are induced by sulfur deficiency. The LSU-like genes in tobacco were characterized as UP9 (UPregulated by sulfur deficit 9). LSU-like proteins do not have characteristic domains that provide clues to their function. Despite having only moderate primary sequence conservation they share several common features including small size, a coiled-coil secondary structure and short conserved motifs in specific positions. Although the precise function of LSU-like proteins is still unknown there is some evidence that members of the LSU family are involved in plant responses to environmental challenges, such as sulfur deficiency, and possibly in plant immune responses. Various bioinformatic approaches have identified LSU-like proteins as important hubs for integration of signals from environmental stimuli. In this paper we review a variety of published data on LSU gene expression, the properties of lsu mutants and features of LSU-like proteins in the hope of shedding some light on their possible role in plant metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Localization of ‘response to Low Sulfur’ (LSU) genes in the Arabidopsis genome. Number of base pairs (bp) between LSU open reading frames is indicated. Positions of T-DNA inserts are shown schematically.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4292543&req=5

Figure 1: Localization of ‘response to Low Sulfur’ (LSU) genes in the Arabidopsis genome. Number of base pairs (bp) between LSU open reading frames is indicated. Positions of T-DNA inserts are shown schematically.

Mentions: Arabidopsis thaliana contains four LSU genes (LSU1–LSU4) which are localized in pairs of direct repeats on two chromosomes (Figure 1). The nucleotide sequences of chromosome III corresponding to LSU1 and LSU3 transcripts are separated by about 2250 bp; the distance between LSU2 and LSU4 is slightly shorter (about 2060 bp). The open reading frames (ORFs) are relatively small and consist of about 280 bp. Most LSU genes have no introns; however, a spliced variant of LSU1 (At3g49580.2) encoding a protein with internal deletion of 19 amino acids was reported [http://www.arabidopsis.org]. Searches of publicly available microarrays using the Genvestigator platform (Zimmermann et al., 2004, 2008) showed that LSU1 and LSU2 are strongly expressed under -S but LSU4 appears not to be induced by -S. LSU3 was not included in these microarrays. Expression of LSU1 and LSU2 is induced not only by -S but also by other stressful environmental conditions such as salt stress and AgNO3 treatment.


The family of LSU-like proteins.

Sirko A, Wawrzyńska A, Rodríguez MC, Sęktas P - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Localization of ‘response to Low Sulfur’ (LSU) genes in the Arabidopsis genome. Number of base pairs (bp) between LSU open reading frames is indicated. Positions of T-DNA inserts are shown schematically.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4292543&req=5

Figure 1: Localization of ‘response to Low Sulfur’ (LSU) genes in the Arabidopsis genome. Number of base pairs (bp) between LSU open reading frames is indicated. Positions of T-DNA inserts are shown schematically.
Mentions: Arabidopsis thaliana contains four LSU genes (LSU1–LSU4) which are localized in pairs of direct repeats on two chromosomes (Figure 1). The nucleotide sequences of chromosome III corresponding to LSU1 and LSU3 transcripts are separated by about 2250 bp; the distance between LSU2 and LSU4 is slightly shorter (about 2060 bp). The open reading frames (ORFs) are relatively small and consist of about 280 bp. Most LSU genes have no introns; however, a spliced variant of LSU1 (At3g49580.2) encoding a protein with internal deletion of 19 amino acids was reported [http://www.arabidopsis.org]. Searches of publicly available microarrays using the Genvestigator platform (Zimmermann et al., 2004, 2008) showed that LSU1 and LSU2 are strongly expressed under -S but LSU4 appears not to be induced by -S. LSU3 was not included in these microarrays. Expression of LSU1 and LSU2 is induced not only by -S but also by other stressful environmental conditions such as salt stress and AgNO3 treatment.

Bottom Line: LSU-like proteins do not have characteristic domains that provide clues to their function.Various bioinformatic approaches have identified LSU-like proteins as important hubs for integration of signals from environmental stimuli.In this paper we review a variety of published data on LSU gene expression, the properties of lsu mutants and features of LSU-like proteins in the hope of shedding some light on their possible role in plant metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The plant response to sulfur deficiency includes extensive metabolic changes which can be monitored at various levels (transcriptome, proteome, metabolome) even before the first visible symptoms of sulfur starvation appear. Four members of the plant-specific LSU (response to Low SUlfur) gene family occur in Arabidopsis thaliana (LSU1-4). Variable numbers of LSU genes occur in other plant species but they were studied only in Arabidopsis and tobacco. Three out of four of the Arabidopsis LSU genes are induced by sulfur deficiency. The LSU-like genes in tobacco were characterized as UP9 (UPregulated by sulfur deficit 9). LSU-like proteins do not have characteristic domains that provide clues to their function. Despite having only moderate primary sequence conservation they share several common features including small size, a coiled-coil secondary structure and short conserved motifs in specific positions. Although the precise function of LSU-like proteins is still unknown there is some evidence that members of the LSU family are involved in plant responses to environmental challenges, such as sulfur deficiency, and possibly in plant immune responses. Various bioinformatic approaches have identified LSU-like proteins as important hubs for integration of signals from environmental stimuli. In this paper we review a variety of published data on LSU gene expression, the properties of lsu mutants and features of LSU-like proteins in the hope of shedding some light on their possible role in plant metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus