Limits...
The Use of the Self-Standing Turning Transfer Device to Perform Bed-To-Chair Transfers Reduces Physical Stress among Caregivers of Older Patients in a Middle-Income Developing Country.

Goh CH - Front Med (Lausanne) (2014)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the usage and potential benefits of a low-cost, mechanical turning transfer device among elderly patients and their caregivers on a geriatric ward in a developing country in South East Asia.There was a significant reduction in transfer-time with manual transfers compared to STurDi-assisted transfers [mean (SD) = 48.39 (13.98) vs. 36.23 (10.96); p ≤ 0.001].The physical stress rating was significantly lower in STurDi-aided transfers compared to manual transfers, shoulder [median (interquartile range) = 0 (1) vs. 4 (3); p = 0.001], upper back [0 (0) vs. 5 (4); p = 0.001], lower back [0 (1) vs. 5 (3), p = 0.001], whole body [1 (2) vs. 4 (3), p = 0.001], and knee [0 (1) vs. 1 (4), p = 0.001].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Manual transfer of elderly patients remains commonplace in many developing countries because the use of lifting equipment, such as hoists, is often considered unaffordable luxuries. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the usage and potential benefits of a low-cost, mechanical turning transfer device among elderly patients and their caregivers on a geriatric ward in a developing country in South East Asia. Fifty-six inpatients, aged 66-92 years, on a geriatric ward, and their caregivers were recruited. Participants were asked to transfer from bed-to-chair transfer with manual assistance, and the task was repeated using the Self-standing Turning Transfer Device (STurDi). The time taken to perform manual transfers and STurDi-assisted transfers was recorded. Physical strain was assessed using the perceived physical stress-rating tool for caregivers with and without the use of the device. User satisfaction was evaluated using the usefulness, satisfaction, and ease of use questionnaire. There was a significant reduction in transfer-time with manual transfers compared to STurDi-assisted transfers [mean (SD) = 48.39 (13.98) vs. 36.23 (10.96); p ≤ 0.001]. The physical stress rating was significantly lower in STurDi-aided transfers compared to manual transfers, shoulder [median (interquartile range) = 0 (1) vs. 4 (3); p = 0.001], upper back [0 (0) vs. 5 (4); p = 0.001], lower back [0 (1) vs. 5 (3), p = 0.001], whole body [1 (2) vs. 4 (3), p = 0.001], and knee [0 (1) vs. 1 (4), p = 0.001]. In addition, majority of patients and caregivers definitely or strongly agreed that the device was useful, saved time, and was easy to use. We have therefore demonstrated in a setting where manual handling was commonly performed that a low-cost mechanical transfer device reduced caregiver strain and was well received by older patients and caregivers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The self-standing turning transfer device. The frame is made of mild steel. The base is stabilized by the weight of the device and its two small feet. The rotating disk turns easily on the base. The handle is height adjustable.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4292054&req=5

Figure 1: The self-standing turning transfer device. The frame is made of mild steel. The base is stabilized by the weight of the device and its two small feet. The rotating disk turns easily on the base. The handle is height adjustable.

Mentions: The self-standing turning transfer device (STurDi) (patent pending) is a mechanically operated device, constructed from mild steel, developed by biomedical engineers at University of Malaya. A patent application has been filed for this device. The base consists of a disk-shaped turning footplate on a wider steel base, with minimal elevation from ground level. The handle can be adjusted to the appropriate height, and is connected to the base via two thick steel bars (Figure 1). The device had been pre-tested by normal healthy volunteers and was found to be able to withstand weights of up to 200 kg without warping of the steel frame or reduction in the turning function. The bearing used for the device was obtained from Luoyang JiaWei Bearing Manufacturing Co. Ltd., which has implemented the ISO 9001–2008 quality management system. The diameter standard of the bearing was GB/T4663-1994 and the tolerance standard was GB/T 307.42-2002. The mild steel construction had minimal yield strength of 250 MPa (AK Steel Corporation, 2007) and the minimum yield strength of the bolts and nuts used was 393 MPa (K-T Bolt Manufacturing, Inc., 2005).


The Use of the Self-Standing Turning Transfer Device to Perform Bed-To-Chair Transfers Reduces Physical Stress among Caregivers of Older Patients in a Middle-Income Developing Country.

Goh CH - Front Med (Lausanne) (2014)

The self-standing turning transfer device. The frame is made of mild steel. The base is stabilized by the weight of the device and its two small feet. The rotating disk turns easily on the base. The handle is height adjustable.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4292054&req=5

Figure 1: The self-standing turning transfer device. The frame is made of mild steel. The base is stabilized by the weight of the device and its two small feet. The rotating disk turns easily on the base. The handle is height adjustable.
Mentions: The self-standing turning transfer device (STurDi) (patent pending) is a mechanically operated device, constructed from mild steel, developed by biomedical engineers at University of Malaya. A patent application has been filed for this device. The base consists of a disk-shaped turning footplate on a wider steel base, with minimal elevation from ground level. The handle can be adjusted to the appropriate height, and is connected to the base via two thick steel bars (Figure 1). The device had been pre-tested by normal healthy volunteers and was found to be able to withstand weights of up to 200 kg without warping of the steel frame or reduction in the turning function. The bearing used for the device was obtained from Luoyang JiaWei Bearing Manufacturing Co. Ltd., which has implemented the ISO 9001–2008 quality management system. The diameter standard of the bearing was GB/T4663-1994 and the tolerance standard was GB/T 307.42-2002. The mild steel construction had minimal yield strength of 250 MPa (AK Steel Corporation, 2007) and the minimum yield strength of the bolts and nuts used was 393 MPa (K-T Bolt Manufacturing, Inc., 2005).

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the usage and potential benefits of a low-cost, mechanical turning transfer device among elderly patients and their caregivers on a geriatric ward in a developing country in South East Asia.There was a significant reduction in transfer-time with manual transfers compared to STurDi-assisted transfers [mean (SD) = 48.39 (13.98) vs. 36.23 (10.96); p ≤ 0.001].The physical stress rating was significantly lower in STurDi-aided transfers compared to manual transfers, shoulder [median (interquartile range) = 0 (1) vs. 4 (3); p = 0.001], upper back [0 (0) vs. 5 (4); p = 0.001], lower back [0 (1) vs. 5 (3), p = 0.001], whole body [1 (2) vs. 4 (3), p = 0.001], and knee [0 (1) vs. 1 (4), p = 0.001].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Manual transfer of elderly patients remains commonplace in many developing countries because the use of lifting equipment, such as hoists, is often considered unaffordable luxuries. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the usage and potential benefits of a low-cost, mechanical turning transfer device among elderly patients and their caregivers on a geriatric ward in a developing country in South East Asia. Fifty-six inpatients, aged 66-92 years, on a geriatric ward, and their caregivers were recruited. Participants were asked to transfer from bed-to-chair transfer with manual assistance, and the task was repeated using the Self-standing Turning Transfer Device (STurDi). The time taken to perform manual transfers and STurDi-assisted transfers was recorded. Physical strain was assessed using the perceived physical stress-rating tool for caregivers with and without the use of the device. User satisfaction was evaluated using the usefulness, satisfaction, and ease of use questionnaire. There was a significant reduction in transfer-time with manual transfers compared to STurDi-assisted transfers [mean (SD) = 48.39 (13.98) vs. 36.23 (10.96); p ≤ 0.001]. The physical stress rating was significantly lower in STurDi-aided transfers compared to manual transfers, shoulder [median (interquartile range) = 0 (1) vs. 4 (3); p = 0.001], upper back [0 (0) vs. 5 (4); p = 0.001], lower back [0 (1) vs. 5 (3), p = 0.001], whole body [1 (2) vs. 4 (3), p = 0.001], and knee [0 (1) vs. 1 (4), p = 0.001]. In addition, majority of patients and caregivers definitely or strongly agreed that the device was useful, saved time, and was easy to use. We have therefore demonstrated in a setting where manual handling was commonly performed that a low-cost mechanical transfer device reduced caregiver strain and was well received by older patients and caregivers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus