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Tissue damage markers after a spinal manipulation in healthy subjects: a preliminary report of a randomized controlled trial.

Achalandabaso A, Plaza-Manzano G, Lomas-Vega R, Martínez-Amat A, Camacho MV, Gassó M, Hita-Contreras F, Molina F - Dis. Markers (2014)

Bottom Line: The procedure was repeated right after the intervention and two hours after the intervention.Statistical analysis was performed through a 3 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA.Our data suggest that the mechanical strain produced by SM seems to be innocuous to the joints and surrounding tissues in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Fisioterapia y Psicología Soluciona, 18002 Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Spinal manipulation (SM) is a manual therapy technique frequently applied to treat musculoskeletal disorders because of its analgesic effects. It is defined by a manual procedure involving a directed impulse to move a joint past its physiologic range of movement (ROM). In this sense, to exceed the physiologic ROM of a joint could trigger tissue damage, which might represent an adverse effect associated with spinal manipulation. The present work tries to explore the presence of tissue damage associated with SM through the damage markers analysis. Thirty healthy subjects recruited at the University of Jaén were submitted to a placebo SM (control group; n = 10), a single lower cervical manipulation (cervical group; n = 10), and a thoracic manipulation (n = 10). Before the intervention, blood samples were extracted and centrifuged to obtain plasma and serum. The procedure was repeated right after the intervention and two hours after the intervention. Tissue damage markers creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), troponin-I, myoglobin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and aldolase were determined in samples. Statistical analysis was performed through a 3 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA. Neither cervical manipulation nor thoracic manipulation did produce significant changes in the CPK, LDH, CRP, troponin-I, myoglobin, NSE, or aldolase blood levels. Our data suggest that the mechanical strain produced by SM seems to be innocuous to the joints and surrounding tissues in healthy subjects.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart diagram of the study.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Flowchart diagram of the study.

Mentions: Of the 40 patients screened in the University of Jaén, a total of 30 subjects met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate in the study. Ten participants were randomly assigned to each treatment group. Demographic data are displayed in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the flowchart depicting participant recruitment and retention. No differences were observed between groups at baseline measures. Only CPR shows a difference in the limits of significance. No vitamin supplementation was reported by the participants. They followed the Mediterranean diet [28] and had a sedentary lifestyle [29].


Tissue damage markers after a spinal manipulation in healthy subjects: a preliminary report of a randomized controlled trial.

Achalandabaso A, Plaza-Manzano G, Lomas-Vega R, Martínez-Amat A, Camacho MV, Gassó M, Hita-Contreras F, Molina F - Dis. Markers (2014)

Flowchart diagram of the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4291009&req=5

fig1: Flowchart diagram of the study.
Mentions: Of the 40 patients screened in the University of Jaén, a total of 30 subjects met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate in the study. Ten participants were randomly assigned to each treatment group. Demographic data are displayed in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the flowchart depicting participant recruitment and retention. No differences were observed between groups at baseline measures. Only CPR shows a difference in the limits of significance. No vitamin supplementation was reported by the participants. They followed the Mediterranean diet [28] and had a sedentary lifestyle [29].

Bottom Line: The procedure was repeated right after the intervention and two hours after the intervention.Statistical analysis was performed through a 3 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA.Our data suggest that the mechanical strain produced by SM seems to be innocuous to the joints and surrounding tissues in healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Fisioterapia y Psicología Soluciona, 18002 Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Spinal manipulation (SM) is a manual therapy technique frequently applied to treat musculoskeletal disorders because of its analgesic effects. It is defined by a manual procedure involving a directed impulse to move a joint past its physiologic range of movement (ROM). In this sense, to exceed the physiologic ROM of a joint could trigger tissue damage, which might represent an adverse effect associated with spinal manipulation. The present work tries to explore the presence of tissue damage associated with SM through the damage markers analysis. Thirty healthy subjects recruited at the University of Jaén were submitted to a placebo SM (control group; n = 10), a single lower cervical manipulation (cervical group; n = 10), and a thoracic manipulation (n = 10). Before the intervention, blood samples were extracted and centrifuged to obtain plasma and serum. The procedure was repeated right after the intervention and two hours after the intervention. Tissue damage markers creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), troponin-I, myoglobin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and aldolase were determined in samples. Statistical analysis was performed through a 3 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA. Neither cervical manipulation nor thoracic manipulation did produce significant changes in the CPK, LDH, CRP, troponin-I, myoglobin, NSE, or aldolase blood levels. Our data suggest that the mechanical strain produced by SM seems to be innocuous to the joints and surrounding tissues in healthy subjects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus