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Effect of the number of implants on stress distribution of anterior implant-supported fixed prostheses combined with a removable partial denture: a finite element analysis.

Mahshid M, Geramy A, Ejlali M, Sedaghat Monfared M, Rezvani Habib Abadi S - J Dent (Tehran) (2014)

Bottom Line: Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM) were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture.With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated.Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Associate Professor, Prosthodontics Department, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate differences in stress distribution relevant to the number of implants under an anterior bridge when combined with a removable partial denture in the posterior region.

Materials and methods: Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM) were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture. A nonrigid connection was selected as the attachment method between the partial denture and the anterior implant-supported fixed prosthesis; 2, 3, 4 and 5 implants supporting the bridge all with 10mm length and 3.8 mm diameter were assessed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated.

Results: In spongy bone, stress forces showed a decrease from 2 implants to 4 implants but showed an increase in the 5-implant model. Stresses on cortical bone of terminal implants were in similar range in the 2-, 3- and 4-implant models. While, in the 5-implant model the amount of stresses on terminal implants increased dramatically. The stresses on implants were nearly similar in all models, with the greatest amount on terminal implants.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model. The stresses transferred to implants were nearly similar.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of implants (2, 3, 4, 5) in different models (A–D).Anterior teeth designs were based on the average dimensions [17]. Each model consisted of a cancellous core surrounded by 1 mm thick cortical layer and 1.5 mm thick gingiva.
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f1-jod-11-335: Number of implants (2, 3, 4, 5) in different models (A–D).Anterior teeth designs were based on the average dimensions [17]. Each model consisted of a cancellous core surrounded by 1 mm thick cortical layer and 1.5 mm thick gingiva.

Mentions: The distances were the same for both sides due to the symmetry of the 3D models (Figure 1A–D). The location of the terminal abutments was fixed in all models.


Effect of the number of implants on stress distribution of anterior implant-supported fixed prostheses combined with a removable partial denture: a finite element analysis.

Mahshid M, Geramy A, Ejlali M, Sedaghat Monfared M, Rezvani Habib Abadi S - J Dent (Tehran) (2014)

Number of implants (2, 3, 4, 5) in different models (A–D).Anterior teeth designs were based on the average dimensions [17]. Each model consisted of a cancellous core surrounded by 1 mm thick cortical layer and 1.5 mm thick gingiva.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4290762&req=5

f1-jod-11-335: Number of implants (2, 3, 4, 5) in different models (A–D).Anterior teeth designs were based on the average dimensions [17]. Each model consisted of a cancellous core surrounded by 1 mm thick cortical layer and 1.5 mm thick gingiva.
Mentions: The distances were the same for both sides due to the symmetry of the 3D models (Figure 1A–D). The location of the terminal abutments was fixed in all models.

Bottom Line: Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM) were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture.With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated.Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Associate Professor, Prosthodontics Department, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate differences in stress distribution relevant to the number of implants under an anterior bridge when combined with a removable partial denture in the posterior region.

Materials and methods: Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM) were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture. A nonrigid connection was selected as the attachment method between the partial denture and the anterior implant-supported fixed prosthesis; 2, 3, 4 and 5 implants supporting the bridge all with 10mm length and 3.8 mm diameter were assessed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated.

Results: In spongy bone, stress forces showed a decrease from 2 implants to 4 implants but showed an increase in the 5-implant model. Stresses on cortical bone of terminal implants were in similar range in the 2-, 3- and 4-implant models. While, in the 5-implant model the amount of stresses on terminal implants increased dramatically. The stresses on implants were nearly similar in all models, with the greatest amount on terminal implants.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model. The stresses transferred to implants were nearly similar.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus