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Late outcome of a randomized study on oral magnesium for premature complexes.

De Falco CN, Darrieux FC, Grupi C, Sacilotto L, Pisani CF, Lara S, Ramires JA, Sosa E, Wu TC, Hachul D, Scanavacca M - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Relapsing patients treated again had a statistically significant reduction in the PC density of 138.25/hour (p < 0.001).The crossing-over patients reduced it by 247/hour (p < 0.001).However, improvement in the PC frequency and symptoms was observed in the second phase of treatment, similar to the response in the first phase of treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ventricular and supraventricular premature complexes (PC) are frequent and usually symptomatic. According to a previous study, magnesium pidolate (MgP) administration to symptomatic patients can improve the PC density and symptoms.

Objective: To assess the late follow-up of that clinical intervention in patients treated with MgP or placebo.

Methods: In the first phase of the study, 90 symptomatic and consecutive patients with PC were randomized (double-blind) to receive either MgP or placebo for 30 days. Monthly follow-up visits were conducted for 15 months to assess symptoms and control electrolytes. 24-hour Holter was performed twice, regardless of symptoms, or whenever symptoms were present. In the second phase of the study, relapsing patients, who had received MgP or placebo (crossing-over) in the first phase, were treated with MgP according to the same protocol.

Results: Of the 45 patients initially treated with MgP, 17 (37.8%) relapsed during the 15-month follow-up, and the relapse time varied. Relapsing patients treated again had a statistically significant reduction in the PC density of 138.25/hour (p < 0.001). The crossing-over patients reduced it by 247/hour (p < 0.001). Patients who did not relapse, had a low PC frequency (3 PC/hour). Retreated patients had a 76.5% improvement in symptom, and crossing-over patients, 71.4%.

Conclusion: Some patients on MgP had relapse of symptoms and PC, indicating that MgP is neither a definitive nor a curative treatment for late follow-up. However, improvement in the PC frequency and symptoms was observed in the second phase of treatment, similar to the response in the first phase of treatment.

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Mean profiles of density of extrasystoles in each treatment in patients of theplacebo group undergoing crossing-over.
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f03: Mean profiles of density of extrasystoles in each treatment in patients of theplacebo group undergoing crossing-over.

Mentions: Of the 45 patients treated with placebo in the first phase, 6 (13.3%) improved theirsymptoms and 39 (86.7%) remained symptomatic. Of those 39, 21 agreed to receive MgPand were selected for crossing-over. Patients who did not agree to receive MgP wereexcluded from the analysis. The crossing-over patients had a statisticallysignificant mean reduction in the PC density when using MgP (p < 0.001), while,when on placebo, no change in density was observed (p > 0.999). The meanimprovement in PC density was 247/hour, greater in the treatment with MgP than in thefirst treatment with placebo (p < 0.001) (Table2 and Figure 3).


Late outcome of a randomized study on oral magnesium for premature complexes.

De Falco CN, Darrieux FC, Grupi C, Sacilotto L, Pisani CF, Lara S, Ramires JA, Sosa E, Wu TC, Hachul D, Scanavacca M - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Mean profiles of density of extrasystoles in each treatment in patients of theplacebo group undergoing crossing-over.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4290737&req=5

f03: Mean profiles of density of extrasystoles in each treatment in patients of theplacebo group undergoing crossing-over.
Mentions: Of the 45 patients treated with placebo in the first phase, 6 (13.3%) improved theirsymptoms and 39 (86.7%) remained symptomatic. Of those 39, 21 agreed to receive MgPand were selected for crossing-over. Patients who did not agree to receive MgP wereexcluded from the analysis. The crossing-over patients had a statisticallysignificant mean reduction in the PC density when using MgP (p < 0.001), while,when on placebo, no change in density was observed (p > 0.999). The meanimprovement in PC density was 247/hour, greater in the treatment with MgP than in thefirst treatment with placebo (p < 0.001) (Table2 and Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Relapsing patients treated again had a statistically significant reduction in the PC density of 138.25/hour (p < 0.001).The crossing-over patients reduced it by 247/hour (p < 0.001).However, improvement in the PC frequency and symptoms was observed in the second phase of treatment, similar to the response in the first phase of treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ventricular and supraventricular premature complexes (PC) are frequent and usually symptomatic. According to a previous study, magnesium pidolate (MgP) administration to symptomatic patients can improve the PC density and symptoms.

Objective: To assess the late follow-up of that clinical intervention in patients treated with MgP or placebo.

Methods: In the first phase of the study, 90 symptomatic and consecutive patients with PC were randomized (double-blind) to receive either MgP or placebo for 30 days. Monthly follow-up visits were conducted for 15 months to assess symptoms and control electrolytes. 24-hour Holter was performed twice, regardless of symptoms, or whenever symptoms were present. In the second phase of the study, relapsing patients, who had received MgP or placebo (crossing-over) in the first phase, were treated with MgP according to the same protocol.

Results: Of the 45 patients initially treated with MgP, 17 (37.8%) relapsed during the 15-month follow-up, and the relapse time varied. Relapsing patients treated again had a statistically significant reduction in the PC density of 138.25/hour (p < 0.001). The crossing-over patients reduced it by 247/hour (p < 0.001). Patients who did not relapse, had a low PC frequency (3 PC/hour). Retreated patients had a 76.5% improvement in symptom, and crossing-over patients, 71.4%.

Conclusion: Some patients on MgP had relapse of symptoms and PC, indicating that MgP is neither a definitive nor a curative treatment for late follow-up. However, improvement in the PC frequency and symptoms was observed in the second phase of treatment, similar to the response in the first phase of treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus