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Effect of intense physical exercise on hepcidin levels and selected parameters of iron metabolism in rowing athletes.

Skarpańska-Stejnborn A, Basta P, Trzeciak J, Szcześniak-Pilaczyńska Ł - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The high-intensity exercise test caused significant changes in hepcidin levels, IL-6, and iron metabolism parameters, with their subsequent return to baseline values during the recovery period.The serum iron levels decreased significantly during the recovery compared with pre- and post-exercise levels.These results suggest that the high-intensity ergometric test was reflected by a marked decrease in serum level of iron during the recovery period, but did not induce concomitant changes in the remaining erythrocyte parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Morphological and Health Sciences, Faculty of Physical Culture in Gorzów Wlkp., Gorzów Wielkopolski, Poland, ankass@poczta.onet.pl.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Physical exercise, especially intense physical exercise, causes a number of unfavorable changes, including an increase in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines with the resultant sequestration of iron in macrophages and decreased iron absorption. This can lead to a reduced supply of iron for erythroid progenitor cells and promote the development of anemia.

Method: This study included a group of 20 rowing athletes, members of the National Polish Rowing Team. The participants performed a 2,000-m maximum test on a rowing ergometer. Blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein prior to the exercise test, 1 min after completing the test, and after a 24-h recovery period. We determined the levels of hepcidin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α, soluble transferrin receptor, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, unbound iron-binding capacity, iron, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, creatine kinase, and myoglobin.

Result: The high-intensity exercise test caused significant changes in hepcidin levels, IL-6, and iron metabolism parameters, with their subsequent return to baseline values during the recovery period. The serum iron levels decreased significantly during the recovery compared with pre- and post-exercise levels.

Conclusion: These results suggest that the high-intensity ergometric test was reflected by a marked decrease in serum level of iron during the recovery period, but did not induce concomitant changes in the remaining erythrocyte parameters.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum iron a, ferritin b, and hepcidin c levels in rowers at baseline, immediately after exercise, and after a 1-day recovery period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *Statistically significant difference between trials (p < 0.05)
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Fig1: Serum iron a, ferritin b, and hepcidin c levels in rowers at baseline, immediately after exercise, and after a 1-day recovery period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *Statistically significant difference between trials (p < 0.05)

Mentions: The values of blood parameters that indicate iron metabolism in the studied athletes are presented in Table 4 and Fig. 1 (a: iron, b: ferritin, and c: hepcidin). Participation in the high-intensity exercise test resulted in a significant increase in most of the studied parameters, and their subsequent return to pre-exercise levels after 1 day of recovery. However, an exercise-induced increase in serum iron level proved insignificant during statistical analysis, and the values for this parameter (documented at the end of the recovery period) were significantly lower than its baseline and post-exercise measurements.Table 4


Effect of intense physical exercise on hepcidin levels and selected parameters of iron metabolism in rowing athletes.

Skarpańska-Stejnborn A, Basta P, Trzeciak J, Szcześniak-Pilaczyńska Ł - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. (2014)

Serum iron a, ferritin b, and hepcidin c levels in rowers at baseline, immediately after exercise, and after a 1-day recovery period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *Statistically significant difference between trials (p < 0.05)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289533&req=5

Fig1: Serum iron a, ferritin b, and hepcidin c levels in rowers at baseline, immediately after exercise, and after a 1-day recovery period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *Statistically significant difference between trials (p < 0.05)
Mentions: The values of blood parameters that indicate iron metabolism in the studied athletes are presented in Table 4 and Fig. 1 (a: iron, b: ferritin, and c: hepcidin). Participation in the high-intensity exercise test resulted in a significant increase in most of the studied parameters, and their subsequent return to pre-exercise levels after 1 day of recovery. However, an exercise-induced increase in serum iron level proved insignificant during statistical analysis, and the values for this parameter (documented at the end of the recovery period) were significantly lower than its baseline and post-exercise measurements.Table 4

Bottom Line: The high-intensity exercise test caused significant changes in hepcidin levels, IL-6, and iron metabolism parameters, with their subsequent return to baseline values during the recovery period.The serum iron levels decreased significantly during the recovery compared with pre- and post-exercise levels.These results suggest that the high-intensity ergometric test was reflected by a marked decrease in serum level of iron during the recovery period, but did not induce concomitant changes in the remaining erythrocyte parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Morphological and Health Sciences, Faculty of Physical Culture in Gorzów Wlkp., Gorzów Wielkopolski, Poland, ankass@poczta.onet.pl.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Physical exercise, especially intense physical exercise, causes a number of unfavorable changes, including an increase in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines with the resultant sequestration of iron in macrophages and decreased iron absorption. This can lead to a reduced supply of iron for erythroid progenitor cells and promote the development of anemia.

Method: This study included a group of 20 rowing athletes, members of the National Polish Rowing Team. The participants performed a 2,000-m maximum test on a rowing ergometer. Blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein prior to the exercise test, 1 min after completing the test, and after a 24-h recovery period. We determined the levels of hepcidin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α, soluble transferrin receptor, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, unbound iron-binding capacity, iron, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, creatine kinase, and myoglobin.

Result: The high-intensity exercise test caused significant changes in hepcidin levels, IL-6, and iron metabolism parameters, with their subsequent return to baseline values during the recovery period. The serum iron levels decreased significantly during the recovery compared with pre- and post-exercise levels.

Conclusion: These results suggest that the high-intensity ergometric test was reflected by a marked decrease in serum level of iron during the recovery period, but did not induce concomitant changes in the remaining erythrocyte parameters.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus