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Family caregivers' role implementation at different stages of dementia.

Huang HL, Shyu YI, Chen MC, Huang CC, Kuo HC, Chen ST, Hsu WC - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Bottom Line: For patients with severe dementia, family caregivers provided more assistance with personal care, mobility and protection, transportation, and housekeeping.Overall, family caregivers reported having some preparation to provide care; the most difficult caregiving activity was identified as managing behavioral problems.This study's results provide a knowledge base for designing dementia stage-specific interventions in clinical practice and developing community-based, long-term care systems for families of patients with dementia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gerontological Care and Management, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore family caregivers' role-implementation experiences at different stages of dementia.

Patients and methods: For this cross-sectional, exploratory study, 176 dyads of family caregivers and their community-dwelling elderly relatives with dementia were recruited from the neurological clinics of a medical center in Taiwan. The Family Caregiving Inventory was used to assess family caregivers for caregiving activities, role strain, role preparation, and help from others at different stages of care receivers' dementia.

Results: Family caregivers' caregiving activities were related to patients' stages of dementia. For patients with mild dementia, caregivers provided more assistance in transportation and housekeeping. In addition to these two activities, family caregivers of patients with moderate dementia provided more assistance with mobility and protection. For patients with severe dementia, family caregivers provided more assistance with personal care, mobility and protection, transportation, and housekeeping. Overall, family caregivers reported having some preparation to provide care; the most difficult caregiving activity was identified as managing behavioral problems.

Conclusion: This study's results provide a knowledge base for designing dementia stage-specific interventions in clinical practice and developing community-based, long-term care systems for families of patients with dementia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Family caregivers’ average role strain from nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia.Abbreviations: Strain overall, role strain for overall amount of care activities; Mob and prot, mobility and protection; Illness care, illness-related care; Bank and legal, managing banking and legal issues; Emot, emotional support; Sx dem, managing symptoms of dementia; Arr care, arranging care.
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f2-cia-10-135: Family caregivers’ average role strain from nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia.Abbreviations: Strain overall, role strain for overall amount of care activities; Mob and prot, mobility and protection; Illness care, illness-related care; Bank and legal, managing banking and legal issues; Emot, emotional support; Sx dem, managing symptoms of dementia; Arr care, arranging care.

Mentions: Family caregivers’ average role strain from doing nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia is shown in Figure 2 and Table S2. Caregivers’ difficulty associated with most types of caregiving activities for patients with mild dementia ranged from easy (mean [M] =0.39, standard deviation [SD] =0.49) to not too hard (M =0.88, SD =0.67), except for activities related to managing symptoms of dementia (M =1.23, SD =0.76), which ranged from not too difficult to somewhat difficult. Most types of caregiving activities for patients with moderate dementia ranged from not too difficult (M =1.19, SD =0.85) to somewhat difficult (M =1.65, SD =0.96), except for helping with banking and legal issues (M =0.58, SD =0.73) and housekeeping (M =0.72, SD =0.74), which ranged between easy and not too difficult. For caregivers of patients with severe dementia, all types of caregiving activities ranged from not too difficult (M =0.99, SD =0.99) to somewhat difficult (M =1.99, SD =1.02). The most difficult type of caregiving activity reported for patients at all three stages of dementia (severity level) was managing symptoms of dementia.


Family caregivers' role implementation at different stages of dementia.

Huang HL, Shyu YI, Chen MC, Huang CC, Kuo HC, Chen ST, Hsu WC - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Family caregivers’ average role strain from nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia.Abbreviations: Strain overall, role strain for overall amount of care activities; Mob and prot, mobility and protection; Illness care, illness-related care; Bank and legal, managing banking and legal issues; Emot, emotional support; Sx dem, managing symptoms of dementia; Arr care, arranging care.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289485&req=5

f2-cia-10-135: Family caregivers’ average role strain from nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia.Abbreviations: Strain overall, role strain for overall amount of care activities; Mob and prot, mobility and protection; Illness care, illness-related care; Bank and legal, managing banking and legal issues; Emot, emotional support; Sx dem, managing symptoms of dementia; Arr care, arranging care.
Mentions: Family caregivers’ average role strain from doing nine types of care activities for persons with mild, moderate, or severe dementia is shown in Figure 2 and Table S2. Caregivers’ difficulty associated with most types of caregiving activities for patients with mild dementia ranged from easy (mean [M] =0.39, standard deviation [SD] =0.49) to not too hard (M =0.88, SD =0.67), except for activities related to managing symptoms of dementia (M =1.23, SD =0.76), which ranged from not too difficult to somewhat difficult. Most types of caregiving activities for patients with moderate dementia ranged from not too difficult (M =1.19, SD =0.85) to somewhat difficult (M =1.65, SD =0.96), except for helping with banking and legal issues (M =0.58, SD =0.73) and housekeeping (M =0.72, SD =0.74), which ranged between easy and not too difficult. For caregivers of patients with severe dementia, all types of caregiving activities ranged from not too difficult (M =0.99, SD =0.99) to somewhat difficult (M =1.99, SD =1.02). The most difficult type of caregiving activity reported for patients at all three stages of dementia (severity level) was managing symptoms of dementia.

Bottom Line: For patients with severe dementia, family caregivers provided more assistance with personal care, mobility and protection, transportation, and housekeeping.Overall, family caregivers reported having some preparation to provide care; the most difficult caregiving activity was identified as managing behavioral problems.This study's results provide a knowledge base for designing dementia stage-specific interventions in clinical practice and developing community-based, long-term care systems for families of patients with dementia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gerontological Care and Management, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore family caregivers' role-implementation experiences at different stages of dementia.

Patients and methods: For this cross-sectional, exploratory study, 176 dyads of family caregivers and their community-dwelling elderly relatives with dementia were recruited from the neurological clinics of a medical center in Taiwan. The Family Caregiving Inventory was used to assess family caregivers for caregiving activities, role strain, role preparation, and help from others at different stages of care receivers' dementia.

Results: Family caregivers' caregiving activities were related to patients' stages of dementia. For patients with mild dementia, caregivers provided more assistance in transportation and housekeeping. In addition to these two activities, family caregivers of patients with moderate dementia provided more assistance with mobility and protection. For patients with severe dementia, family caregivers provided more assistance with personal care, mobility and protection, transportation, and housekeeping. Overall, family caregivers reported having some preparation to provide care; the most difficult caregiving activity was identified as managing behavioral problems.

Conclusion: This study's results provide a knowledge base for designing dementia stage-specific interventions in clinical practice and developing community-based, long-term care systems for families of patients with dementia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus