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Prevalence of overweight in 2 to 17 year-old children and adolescents whose parents live separately: a Nordic cross-sectional study.

Hohwü L, Gissler M, Sjöberg A, Biehl AM, Kristjansson AL, Obel C - BMC Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: A significant difference was observed in Iceland between children whose parents live separately compared to those who live with both parents (difference: 9.4%, 95% CI: 2.8; 15.9) but no such difference was observed in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.The missing data analysis indicated that the findings in Norway, Finland and Iceland were partly observed due to selection effects, whereas the adjustment in Denmark was due to confounding.No association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. lena.hohwu@ph.au.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Comparative data of parental separation and childhood overweight has not been available before across the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to examine the within-country prevalence and association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 2-17-year-old children was conducted in 2011, titled: "NordChild". A random sample of 3,200 parents in each of the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden were invited to participate in the study with parents of 6,609 children accepting to give answers about their children's health and welfare including information on height and weight of each child and parental cohabitation (response rate 41.5%). The group differences in prevalence and adjusted odds ratio (OR) for overweight, with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed in children whose parents lived separately. Additionally, a missing data analysis was performed to determine whether the adjusted estimates might result from confounding or selection bias.

Results: A significant difference was observed in Iceland between children whose parents live separately compared to those who live with both parents (difference: 9.4%, 95% CI: 2.8; 15.9) but no such difference was observed in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. No significant odds of overweight were observed in children whose parents lived separately compared to children in normal weight at the time of study; Denmark: OR 1.03 (95% CI: 0.42; 2.53), Finland: OR 1.27 (95% CI: 0.74; 2.20), Iceland: OR 1.50 (95% CI: 0.79; 2.84), Norway: OR 1.46 (95% CI: 0.81; 2.62), and Sweden: 1.07 (95% CI: 0.61; 1.86). The missing data analysis indicated that the findings in Norway, Finland and Iceland were partly observed due to selection effects, whereas the adjustment in Denmark was due to confounding. The crude OR for overweight was higher in the 2-9-year-old group than in the 10-17-year-old group whose parents lived separately in Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Conclusions: No association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children was found. Our finding of greater prevalence of overweight in Icelandic children whose parents live separately may be an indication that the welfare system in Iceland is separating from the other Nordic countries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Missing analysis based on observations included in the adjusted analysis only. The odds ratio (95% CI) for overweight in 2-17-year-old children whose parents lived separately at the time of study, stratified by country.
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Fig2: Missing analysis based on observations included in the adjusted analysis only. The odds ratio (95% CI) for overweight in 2-17-year-old children whose parents lived separately at the time of study, stratified by country.

Mentions: The missing analysis of the association is shown in Figure 2. We found that the adjusted OR in Finland most likely was caused by selection as the two crude ORs differed: 1.73 versus 1.59, p = 0.03 (Figure 1 versus Figure 2). In Finland, Norway and Sweden the adjustment may partly have been due to selection; the crude ORs were 1.23 versus 1.31 (p = 0.23) for Finland, 1.23 versus 1.59 (p = 0.29) for Norway, and 1.43 versus 1.16 (p = 0.24) for Sweden (Figure 1 versus Figure 2). In Denmark, we found the adjustment most likely was due to confounding as the two crude ORs were similar; 1.09 versus 1.12, p = 0.15 (Figure 1 versus Figure 2).Table 2


Prevalence of overweight in 2 to 17 year-old children and adolescents whose parents live separately: a Nordic cross-sectional study.

Hohwü L, Gissler M, Sjöberg A, Biehl AM, Kristjansson AL, Obel C - BMC Public Health (2014)

Missing analysis based on observations included in the adjusted analysis only. The odds ratio (95% CI) for overweight in 2-17-year-old children whose parents lived separately at the time of study, stratified by country.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289363&req=5

Fig2: Missing analysis based on observations included in the adjusted analysis only. The odds ratio (95% CI) for overweight in 2-17-year-old children whose parents lived separately at the time of study, stratified by country.
Mentions: The missing analysis of the association is shown in Figure 2. We found that the adjusted OR in Finland most likely was caused by selection as the two crude ORs differed: 1.73 versus 1.59, p = 0.03 (Figure 1 versus Figure 2). In Finland, Norway and Sweden the adjustment may partly have been due to selection; the crude ORs were 1.23 versus 1.31 (p = 0.23) for Finland, 1.23 versus 1.59 (p = 0.29) for Norway, and 1.43 versus 1.16 (p = 0.24) for Sweden (Figure 1 versus Figure 2). In Denmark, we found the adjustment most likely was due to confounding as the two crude ORs were similar; 1.09 versus 1.12, p = 0.15 (Figure 1 versus Figure 2).Table 2

Bottom Line: A significant difference was observed in Iceland between children whose parents live separately compared to those who live with both parents (difference: 9.4%, 95% CI: 2.8; 15.9) but no such difference was observed in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.The missing data analysis indicated that the findings in Norway, Finland and Iceland were partly observed due to selection effects, whereas the adjustment in Denmark was due to confounding.No association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. lena.hohwu@ph.au.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Comparative data of parental separation and childhood overweight has not been available before across the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to examine the within-country prevalence and association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 2-17-year-old children was conducted in 2011, titled: "NordChild". A random sample of 3,200 parents in each of the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden were invited to participate in the study with parents of 6,609 children accepting to give answers about their children's health and welfare including information on height and weight of each child and parental cohabitation (response rate 41.5%). The group differences in prevalence and adjusted odds ratio (OR) for overweight, with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed in children whose parents lived separately. Additionally, a missing data analysis was performed to determine whether the adjusted estimates might result from confounding or selection bias.

Results: A significant difference was observed in Iceland between children whose parents live separately compared to those who live with both parents (difference: 9.4%, 95% CI: 2.8; 15.9) but no such difference was observed in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. No significant odds of overweight were observed in children whose parents lived separately compared to children in normal weight at the time of study; Denmark: OR 1.03 (95% CI: 0.42; 2.53), Finland: OR 1.27 (95% CI: 0.74; 2.20), Iceland: OR 1.50 (95% CI: 0.79; 2.84), Norway: OR 1.46 (95% CI: 0.81; 2.62), and Sweden: 1.07 (95% CI: 0.61; 1.86). The missing data analysis indicated that the findings in Norway, Finland and Iceland were partly observed due to selection effects, whereas the adjustment in Denmark was due to confounding. The crude OR for overweight was higher in the 2-9-year-old group than in the 10-17-year-old group whose parents lived separately in Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Conclusions: No association between parental cohabitation and overweight in Nordic children was found. Our finding of greater prevalence of overweight in Icelandic children whose parents live separately may be an indication that the welfare system in Iceland is separating from the other Nordic countries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus