Limits...
Indirect genetic effects for growth rate in domestic pigs alter aggressive and manipulative biting behaviour.

Camerlink I, Ursinus WW, Bijma P, Kemp B, Bolhuis JE - Behav. Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are heritable effects of an individual on phenotypic values of others, and may result from social interactions.Selection on high IGEg reduced biting behaviours additive to the, generally much larger, effects of straw-bedding (P < 0.01), with no G × E interactions.These results show opportunities to reduce harmful biting behaviours in pigs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, irene.camerlink@sruc.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are heritable effects of an individual on phenotypic values of others, and may result from social interactions. We determined the behavioural consequences of selection for IGEs for growth (IGEg) in pigs in a G × E treatment design. Pigs (n = 480) were selected for high versus low IGEg with a contrast of 14 g average daily gain and were housed in either barren or straw-enriched pens (n = 80). High IGEg pigs showed from 8 to 23 weeks age 40% less aggressive biting (P = 0.006), 27% less ear biting (P = 0.03), and 40% less biting on enrichment material (P = 0.005). High IGEg pigs had a lower tail damage score (high 2.0; low 2.2; P = 0.004), and consumed 30 % less jute sacks (P = 0.002). Selection on high IGEg reduced biting behaviours additive to the, generally much larger, effects of straw-bedding (P < 0.01), with no G × E interactions. These results show opportunities to reduce harmful biting behaviours in pigs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tail damage score for high IGEg pigs in barren pens, high IGEg pigs in enriched pens, low IGEg pigs in barren pens, and low IGEg pigs in enriched pens. Note that the y-axis ranges from 1 to 3.5 while tail damage scores from individual pigs may range from 1 to 4
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289009&req=5

Fig2: Tail damage score for high IGEg pigs in barren pens, high IGEg pigs in enriched pens, low IGEg pigs in barren pens, and low IGEg pigs in enriched pens. Note that the y-axis ranges from 1 to 3.5 while tail damage scores from individual pigs may range from 1 to 4

Mentions: Pigs already showed tail damage from the moment of weaning, with an average tail damage score of 2.2 (Fig. 2). During the nursery phase (weeks 4–7) there was no difference between the IGEg groups for tail damage (P = 0.93), but a clear difference was present between barren and enriched pens (tail damage score nursery: barren 2.3 ± 0.04; enriched 1.8 ± 0.04; P < 0.001). During the finishing phase (weeks 8–23) high IGEg pigs had a lower tail damage score (high 2.0 ± 0.05; low 2.2 ± 0.05; P = 0.004), and the positive effect of enrichment remained (mean tail damage score finishing: barren 2.6 ± 0.05; enriched 1.6 ± 0.05; P < 0.001). This resulted in an additive effect of IGEg group and straw enrichment on tail damage, without interactions between these two factors (P = 0.79).Fig. 2


Indirect genetic effects for growth rate in domestic pigs alter aggressive and manipulative biting behaviour.

Camerlink I, Ursinus WW, Bijma P, Kemp B, Bolhuis JE - Behav. Genet. (2014)

Tail damage score for high IGEg pigs in barren pens, high IGEg pigs in enriched pens, low IGEg pigs in barren pens, and low IGEg pigs in enriched pens. Note that the y-axis ranges from 1 to 3.5 while tail damage scores from individual pigs may range from 1 to 4
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289009&req=5

Fig2: Tail damage score for high IGEg pigs in barren pens, high IGEg pigs in enriched pens, low IGEg pigs in barren pens, and low IGEg pigs in enriched pens. Note that the y-axis ranges from 1 to 3.5 while tail damage scores from individual pigs may range from 1 to 4
Mentions: Pigs already showed tail damage from the moment of weaning, with an average tail damage score of 2.2 (Fig. 2). During the nursery phase (weeks 4–7) there was no difference between the IGEg groups for tail damage (P = 0.93), but a clear difference was present between barren and enriched pens (tail damage score nursery: barren 2.3 ± 0.04; enriched 1.8 ± 0.04; P < 0.001). During the finishing phase (weeks 8–23) high IGEg pigs had a lower tail damage score (high 2.0 ± 0.05; low 2.2 ± 0.05; P = 0.004), and the positive effect of enrichment remained (mean tail damage score finishing: barren 2.6 ± 0.05; enriched 1.6 ± 0.05; P < 0.001). This resulted in an additive effect of IGEg group and straw enrichment on tail damage, without interactions between these two factors (P = 0.79).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are heritable effects of an individual on phenotypic values of others, and may result from social interactions.Selection on high IGEg reduced biting behaviours additive to the, generally much larger, effects of straw-bedding (P < 0.01), with no G × E interactions.These results show opportunities to reduce harmful biting behaviours in pigs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, irene.camerlink@sruc.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) are heritable effects of an individual on phenotypic values of others, and may result from social interactions. We determined the behavioural consequences of selection for IGEs for growth (IGEg) in pigs in a G × E treatment design. Pigs (n = 480) were selected for high versus low IGEg with a contrast of 14 g average daily gain and were housed in either barren or straw-enriched pens (n = 80). High IGEg pigs showed from 8 to 23 weeks age 40% less aggressive biting (P = 0.006), 27% less ear biting (P = 0.03), and 40% less biting on enrichment material (P = 0.005). High IGEg pigs had a lower tail damage score (high 2.0; low 2.2; P = 0.004), and consumed 30 % less jute sacks (P = 0.002). Selection on high IGEg reduced biting behaviours additive to the, generally much larger, effects of straw-bedding (P < 0.01), with no G × E interactions. These results show opportunities to reduce harmful biting behaviours in pigs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus