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Microrefugia: Not for everyone.

Hylander K, Ehrlén J, Luoto M, Meineri E - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on this, we suggest that only species limited by climatic conditions decoupled from the regional climate can benefit from microrefugia.We argue that this restriction has received little attention in spite of its importance for microrefugia as a mechanism for species resilience (the survival of unfavorable episodes and subsequent range expansion).Presence of microrefugia will depend on both the responses of individual species to local climatic variation and how climate-forcing factors shape the correlation between local and regional climate across space and time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, kristoffer.hylander@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Microrefugia are sites that support populations of species when their ranges contract during unfavorable climate episodes. Here, we review and discuss two aspects relevant for microrefugia. First, distributions of different species are influenced by different climatic variables. Second, climatic variables differ in the degree of local decoupling from the regional climate. Based on this, we suggest that only species limited by climatic conditions decoupled from the regional climate can benefit from microrefugia. We argue that this restriction has received little attention in spite of its importance for microrefugia as a mechanism for species resilience (the survival of unfavorable episodes and subsequent range expansion). Presence of microrefugia will depend on both the responses of individual species to local climatic variation and how climate-forcing factors shape the correlation between local and regional climate across space and time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Species distribution before and after range contraction; a a species with a continuous distribution all the way until a barrier (in the north in this case). b, c After a climatic deterioration (from north in this case) the species retract southward. However, the species linger on in a number of microrefugia (smaller green areas north of the main distribution area). b Many microrefugia even far away, c few microrefugia close to main distribution. When only looking at the current distribution (e.g., b and c  panel) without knowledge of the past it is likely (but not necessary so) that the small isolated patches are remnants from a past wider distribution. However, it is still likely that the conditions in those places have similarities to conditions in the core distribution area
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Fig1: Species distribution before and after range contraction; a a species with a continuous distribution all the way until a barrier (in the north in this case). b, c After a climatic deterioration (from north in this case) the species retract southward. However, the species linger on in a number of microrefugia (smaller green areas north of the main distribution area). b Many microrefugia even far away, c few microrefugia close to main distribution. When only looking at the current distribution (e.g., b and c panel) without knowledge of the past it is likely (but not necessary so) that the small isolated patches are remnants from a past wider distribution. However, it is still likely that the conditions in those places have similarities to conditions in the core distribution area

Mentions: In this paper, we build on the concept by Rull (2009), who defined microrefugia as small areas outside the core distribution area where species persist despite the surroundings being inhospitable (Fig. 1). However, microrefugia may exist also in the absence of a core area if the distribution has contracted to only those small areas (see also Keppel et al. 2012). Here, we discuss scenarios where both a core distribution and microrefugia are present to illustrate how contrasting conditions across space can inform us about microrefugia also in a temporal context. Still, the points we make using this framework will be valid for many other circumstances, including “holdouts” defined as places in which species may persist for a long time after that conditions have deteriorated but where they eventually will go extinct (in contrast to microrefugia where they will survive and expand from) (Hannah et al. 2014).Fig. 1


Microrefugia: Not for everyone.

Hylander K, Ehrlén J, Luoto M, Meineri E - Ambio (2015)

Species distribution before and after range contraction; a a species with a continuous distribution all the way until a barrier (in the north in this case). b, c After a climatic deterioration (from north in this case) the species retract southward. However, the species linger on in a number of microrefugia (smaller green areas north of the main distribution area). b Many microrefugia even far away, c few microrefugia close to main distribution. When only looking at the current distribution (e.g., b and c  panel) without knowledge of the past it is likely (but not necessary so) that the small isolated patches are remnants from a past wider distribution. However, it is still likely that the conditions in those places have similarities to conditions in the core distribution area
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289006&req=5

Fig1: Species distribution before and after range contraction; a a species with a continuous distribution all the way until a barrier (in the north in this case). b, c After a climatic deterioration (from north in this case) the species retract southward. However, the species linger on in a number of microrefugia (smaller green areas north of the main distribution area). b Many microrefugia even far away, c few microrefugia close to main distribution. When only looking at the current distribution (e.g., b and c panel) without knowledge of the past it is likely (but not necessary so) that the small isolated patches are remnants from a past wider distribution. However, it is still likely that the conditions in those places have similarities to conditions in the core distribution area
Mentions: In this paper, we build on the concept by Rull (2009), who defined microrefugia as small areas outside the core distribution area where species persist despite the surroundings being inhospitable (Fig. 1). However, microrefugia may exist also in the absence of a core area if the distribution has contracted to only those small areas (see also Keppel et al. 2012). Here, we discuss scenarios where both a core distribution and microrefugia are present to illustrate how contrasting conditions across space can inform us about microrefugia also in a temporal context. Still, the points we make using this framework will be valid for many other circumstances, including “holdouts” defined as places in which species may persist for a long time after that conditions have deteriorated but where they eventually will go extinct (in contrast to microrefugia where they will survive and expand from) (Hannah et al. 2014).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Based on this, we suggest that only species limited by climatic conditions decoupled from the regional climate can benefit from microrefugia.We argue that this restriction has received little attention in spite of its importance for microrefugia as a mechanism for species resilience (the survival of unfavorable episodes and subsequent range expansion).Presence of microrefugia will depend on both the responses of individual species to local climatic variation and how climate-forcing factors shape the correlation between local and regional climate across space and time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, kristoffer.hylander@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Microrefugia are sites that support populations of species when their ranges contract during unfavorable climate episodes. Here, we review and discuss two aspects relevant for microrefugia. First, distributions of different species are influenced by different climatic variables. Second, climatic variables differ in the degree of local decoupling from the regional climate. Based on this, we suggest that only species limited by climatic conditions decoupled from the regional climate can benefit from microrefugia. We argue that this restriction has received little attention in spite of its importance for microrefugia as a mechanism for species resilience (the survival of unfavorable episodes and subsequent range expansion). Presence of microrefugia will depend on both the responses of individual species to local climatic variation and how climate-forcing factors shape the correlation between local and regional climate across space and time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus