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Closing the collaborative gap: Aligning social and ecological connectivity for better management of interconnected wetlands.

Kininmonth S, Bergsten A, Bodin Ö - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: Understanding how governance structures align to ecological processes in a landscape is critical for effective management of ecological resources.Coordination and collaboration among managing actors, each managing their own piece of the puzzle, is therefore essentially a requirement for effective management.We discuss this pattern emergence, its potential implications, and examine which municipalities adopt these coordinating functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, stuart.kininmonth@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Understanding how governance structures align to ecological processes in a landscape is critical for effective management of ecological resources. Ecological resources are not independent from each other, instead they are interconnected, and their well-being is often critically dependent on upholding ecological connectivity, especially in times of change and disturbances. Coordination and collaboration among managing actors, each managing their own piece of the puzzle, is therefore essentially a requirement for effective management. We present a conceptual model that includes ecological resources, managing and coordinating actors, along with an explicit representation on how all these entities are connected to each other. We apply this model to 25 municipalities that manage 408 wetlands in central Sweden. The study shows a good social and ecological alignment, however with a high prevalence for coordination through third parties. We discuss this pattern emergence, its potential implications, and examine which municipalities adopt these coordinating functions.

No MeSH data available.


Overview of the Stockholm County wetland case study area with social and ecological links shown. Each ecological node comprises at least 6 ha of wetland. Municipal Council codes are described in Table 1. In addition to the ecological and social links explicitly displayed, there are also socio-ecological links between actors to each ecological node in the municipal jurisdiction. For example, the arrow indicates a trans-boundary ecological node, linked to both TA and VT
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Fig3: Overview of the Stockholm County wetland case study area with social and ecological links shown. Each ecological node comprises at least 6 ha of wetland. Municipal Council codes are described in Table 1. In addition to the ecological and social links explicitly displayed, there are also socio-ecological links between actors to each ecological node in the municipal jurisdiction. For example, the arrow indicates a trans-boundary ecological node, linked to both TA and VT

Mentions: Links between the social network and the ecological network represent each municipality’s responsibility to manage each ecological node (movement zone) in its municipal jurisdiction. Movement zones that stretch over several municipalities have multiple social–ecological links, one to each of these municipalities (Fig. 3).


Closing the collaborative gap: Aligning social and ecological connectivity for better management of interconnected wetlands.

Kininmonth S, Bergsten A, Bodin Ö - Ambio (2015)

Overview of the Stockholm County wetland case study area with social and ecological links shown. Each ecological node comprises at least 6 ha of wetland. Municipal Council codes are described in Table 1. In addition to the ecological and social links explicitly displayed, there are also socio-ecological links between actors to each ecological node in the municipal jurisdiction. For example, the arrow indicates a trans-boundary ecological node, linked to both TA and VT
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289001&req=5

Fig3: Overview of the Stockholm County wetland case study area with social and ecological links shown. Each ecological node comprises at least 6 ha of wetland. Municipal Council codes are described in Table 1. In addition to the ecological and social links explicitly displayed, there are also socio-ecological links between actors to each ecological node in the municipal jurisdiction. For example, the arrow indicates a trans-boundary ecological node, linked to both TA and VT
Mentions: Links between the social network and the ecological network represent each municipality’s responsibility to manage each ecological node (movement zone) in its municipal jurisdiction. Movement zones that stretch over several municipalities have multiple social–ecological links, one to each of these municipalities (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Understanding how governance structures align to ecological processes in a landscape is critical for effective management of ecological resources.Coordination and collaboration among managing actors, each managing their own piece of the puzzle, is therefore essentially a requirement for effective management.We discuss this pattern emergence, its potential implications, and examine which municipalities adopt these coordinating functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, stuart.kininmonth@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Understanding how governance structures align to ecological processes in a landscape is critical for effective management of ecological resources. Ecological resources are not independent from each other, instead they are interconnected, and their well-being is often critically dependent on upholding ecological connectivity, especially in times of change and disturbances. Coordination and collaboration among managing actors, each managing their own piece of the puzzle, is therefore essentially a requirement for effective management. We present a conceptual model that includes ecological resources, managing and coordinating actors, along with an explicit representation on how all these entities are connected to each other. We apply this model to 25 municipalities that manage 408 wetlands in central Sweden. The study shows a good social and ecological alignment, however with a high prevalence for coordination through third parties. We discuss this pattern emergence, its potential implications, and examine which municipalities adopt these coordinating functions.

No MeSH data available.