Limits...
Climate change, phenology, and butterfly host plant utilization.

Navarro-Cano JA, Karlsson B, Posledovich D, Toftegaard T, Wiklund C, Ehrlén J, Gotthard K - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist.This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants.However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, jose.a.navarro@uv.es.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge of how species interactions are influenced by climate warming is paramount to understand current biodiversity changes. We review phenological changes of Swedish butterflies during the latest decades and explore potential climate effects on butterfly-host plant interactions using the Orange tip butterfly Anthocharis cardamines and its host plants as a model system. This butterfly has advanced its appearance dates substantially, and its mean flight date shows a positive correlation with latitude. We show that there is a large latitudinal variation in host use and that butterfly populations select plant individuals based on their flowering phenology. We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist. This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants. However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate.

No MeSH data available.


Mean number of eggs per plant (±SE) for seven different host plant species and three different regions along a latitudinal gradient. Means among species with different letter are significantly different (Tukey multiple Comparisons, P < 0.05). NA indicates that no populations of a host species were found in a region. The asterisk denotes that only one population was found. Species abbreviations: arth = Arabidopsis thaliana), thca = Thlaspicaerulescens, cabu = Capsellabursa-pastoris, capr4 = Cardamine pratensis), capr8 = Cardamine paludosa, arhi = Arabis hirsuta, and argl = Arabis glabra
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289000&req=5

Fig5: Mean number of eggs per plant (±SE) for seven different host plant species and three different regions along a latitudinal gradient. Means among species with different letter are significantly different (Tukey multiple Comparisons, P < 0.05). NA indicates that no populations of a host species were found in a region. The asterisk denotes that only one population was found. Species abbreviations: arth = Arabidopsis thaliana), thca = Thlaspicaerulescens, cabu = Capsellabursa-pastoris, capr4 = Cardamine pratensis), capr8 = Cardamine paludosa, arhi = Arabis hirsuta, and argl = Arabis glabra

Mentions: The mean number of eggs per plant (number of eggs/number of plants in each plot) varied among host species (Table 2; Fig. 5). However, host use differed among the three regions (significant interaction region × species in Table 2). In the south region, the most used species for oviposition was C. paludosa, in the central region it was C. pratensis, and in the north region, A. glabra was the most attacked species (Fig. 5). From the butterfly’s perspective, there was a difference between regions concerning which host plant was most used for oviposition (Table 1).Table 2


Climate change, phenology, and butterfly host plant utilization.

Navarro-Cano JA, Karlsson B, Posledovich D, Toftegaard T, Wiklund C, Ehrlén J, Gotthard K - Ambio (2015)

Mean number of eggs per plant (±SE) for seven different host plant species and three different regions along a latitudinal gradient. Means among species with different letter are significantly different (Tukey multiple Comparisons, P < 0.05). NA indicates that no populations of a host species were found in a region. The asterisk denotes that only one population was found. Species abbreviations: arth = Arabidopsis thaliana), thca = Thlaspicaerulescens, cabu = Capsellabursa-pastoris, capr4 = Cardamine pratensis), capr8 = Cardamine paludosa, arhi = Arabis hirsuta, and argl = Arabis glabra
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4289000&req=5

Fig5: Mean number of eggs per plant (±SE) for seven different host plant species and three different regions along a latitudinal gradient. Means among species with different letter are significantly different (Tukey multiple Comparisons, P < 0.05). NA indicates that no populations of a host species were found in a region. The asterisk denotes that only one population was found. Species abbreviations: arth = Arabidopsis thaliana), thca = Thlaspicaerulescens, cabu = Capsellabursa-pastoris, capr4 = Cardamine pratensis), capr8 = Cardamine paludosa, arhi = Arabis hirsuta, and argl = Arabis glabra
Mentions: The mean number of eggs per plant (number of eggs/number of plants in each plot) varied among host species (Table 2; Fig. 5). However, host use differed among the three regions (significant interaction region × species in Table 2). In the south region, the most used species for oviposition was C. paludosa, in the central region it was C. pratensis, and in the north region, A. glabra was the most attacked species (Fig. 5). From the butterfly’s perspective, there was a difference between regions concerning which host plant was most used for oviposition (Table 1).Table 2

Bottom Line: We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist.This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants.However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, jose.a.navarro@uv.es.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge of how species interactions are influenced by climate warming is paramount to understand current biodiversity changes. We review phenological changes of Swedish butterflies during the latest decades and explore potential climate effects on butterfly-host plant interactions using the Orange tip butterfly Anthocharis cardamines and its host plants as a model system. This butterfly has advanced its appearance dates substantially, and its mean flight date shows a positive correlation with latitude. We show that there is a large latitudinal variation in host use and that butterfly populations select plant individuals based on their flowering phenology. We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist. This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants. However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate.

No MeSH data available.