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Predicting climate change effects on wetland ecosystem services using species distribution modeling and plant functional traits.

Moor H, Hylander K, Norberg J - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: We model changes in CWMT values for traits relevant to three key services, focusing on the regional species pool in the Norrström area (central Sweden) and three main wetland types.Our method predicts proportional shifts toward faster growing, more productive and taller species, which tend to increase CWMT values of specific leaf area and canopy height, whereas changes in root depth vary.The predicted changes in CWMT values suggest a potential increase in flood attenuation services, a potential increase in short (but not long)-term nutrient retention, and ambiguous outcomes for carbon sequestration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, helen.moor@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services, the sustainable use of which requires knowledge of the underlying ecological mechanisms. Functional traits, particularly the community-weighted mean trait (CWMT), provide a strong link between species communities and ecosystem functioning. We here combine species distribution modeling and plant functional traits to estimate the direction of change of ecosystem processes under climate change. We model changes in CWMT values for traits relevant to three key services, focusing on the regional species pool in the Norrström area (central Sweden) and three main wetland types. Our method predicts proportional shifts toward faster growing, more productive and taller species, which tend to increase CWMT values of specific leaf area and canopy height, whereas changes in root depth vary. The predicted changes in CWMT values suggest a potential increase in flood attenuation services, a potential increase in short (but not long)-term nutrient retention, and ambiguous outcomes for carbon sequestration.

No MeSH data available.


Predicted proportional change of mycorrhizal association, shown separately for the field layer (a, c, e) and shrub layer (b, d, f) in the three wetland types. There is no change in the bog shrub layer as all species are obligatory mycorrhizal
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Fig4: Predicted proportional change of mycorrhizal association, shown separately for the field layer (a, c, e) and shrub layer (b, d, f) in the three wetland types. There is no change in the bog shrub layer as all species are obligatory mycorrhizal

Mentions: Shifts to higher proportions of herbaceous plants in bogs and riparian wetlands (Fig. 3a, c), and to more summer green species in the fen field layer (Fig. 3h), mirror increases in SLA. The decrease of rhizomatous species in bogs (Fig. 3d) might decrease nutrient storage in belowground biomass but could slow peat decomposition via reduced soil oxygenation, while increases in tussock-forming species would benefit water flow resistance; in fens, the opposite pattern emerges (Fig. 3e). Increases in persistent green species in bogs and the fen shrub layer (Fig. 3g, h) suggest more recalcitrant litter with lower decomposition rates, slightly counteracting SLA increases. The shift from nonmycorrhizal to more facultative mycorrhizal species in all field layers (Fig. 4a–d) indicates higher potential for nutrient uptake and increased plant productivity, but this might be counteracted by decreases in obligatory mycorrhizal species among shrubs in fens and riparian wetlands (Fig. 4d, f).Fig. 4


Predicting climate change effects on wetland ecosystem services using species distribution modeling and plant functional traits.

Moor H, Hylander K, Norberg J - Ambio (2015)

Predicted proportional change of mycorrhizal association, shown separately for the field layer (a, c, e) and shrub layer (b, d, f) in the three wetland types. There is no change in the bog shrub layer as all species are obligatory mycorrhizal
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288999&req=5

Fig4: Predicted proportional change of mycorrhizal association, shown separately for the field layer (a, c, e) and shrub layer (b, d, f) in the three wetland types. There is no change in the bog shrub layer as all species are obligatory mycorrhizal
Mentions: Shifts to higher proportions of herbaceous plants in bogs and riparian wetlands (Fig. 3a, c), and to more summer green species in the fen field layer (Fig. 3h), mirror increases in SLA. The decrease of rhizomatous species in bogs (Fig. 3d) might decrease nutrient storage in belowground biomass but could slow peat decomposition via reduced soil oxygenation, while increases in tussock-forming species would benefit water flow resistance; in fens, the opposite pattern emerges (Fig. 3e). Increases in persistent green species in bogs and the fen shrub layer (Fig. 3g, h) suggest more recalcitrant litter with lower decomposition rates, slightly counteracting SLA increases. The shift from nonmycorrhizal to more facultative mycorrhizal species in all field layers (Fig. 4a–d) indicates higher potential for nutrient uptake and increased plant productivity, but this might be counteracted by decreases in obligatory mycorrhizal species among shrubs in fens and riparian wetlands (Fig. 4d, f).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: We model changes in CWMT values for traits relevant to three key services, focusing on the regional species pool in the Norrström area (central Sweden) and three main wetland types.Our method predicts proportional shifts toward faster growing, more productive and taller species, which tend to increase CWMT values of specific leaf area and canopy height, whereas changes in root depth vary.The predicted changes in CWMT values suggest a potential increase in flood attenuation services, a potential increase in short (but not long)-term nutrient retention, and ambiguous outcomes for carbon sequestration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, helen.moor@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services, the sustainable use of which requires knowledge of the underlying ecological mechanisms. Functional traits, particularly the community-weighted mean trait (CWMT), provide a strong link between species communities and ecosystem functioning. We here combine species distribution modeling and plant functional traits to estimate the direction of change of ecosystem processes under climate change. We model changes in CWMT values for traits relevant to three key services, focusing on the regional species pool in the Norrström area (central Sweden) and three main wetland types. Our method predicts proportional shifts toward faster growing, more productive and taller species, which tend to increase CWMT values of specific leaf area and canopy height, whereas changes in root depth vary. The predicted changes in CWMT values suggest a potential increase in flood attenuation services, a potential increase in short (but not long)-term nutrient retention, and ambiguous outcomes for carbon sequestration.

No MeSH data available.