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Dissecting the ecosystem service of large-scale pollutant retention: The role of wetlands and other landscape features.

Quin A, Jaramillo F, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: Various features of a landscape contribute to the regulating ecosystem service of reducing waterborne pollutant loading to downstream environments.At local scales, wetlands have been shown to be effective in retaining pollutants.We develop a general analytical model which shows that the retention contribution of wetlands and other landscape features is only significant if a large fraction of the total waterborne pollutant transport passes through them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, andrew.quin@natgeo.su.se.

ABSTRACT
Various features of a landscape contribute to the regulating ecosystem service of reducing waterborne pollutant loading to downstream environments. At local scales, wetlands have been shown to be effective in retaining pollutants. Here, we investigate the landscape-scale contribution to pollutant retention provided by multiple wetlands. We develop a general analytical model which shows that the retention contribution of wetlands and other landscape features is only significant if a large fraction of the total waterborne pollutant transport passes through them. Next, by means of a statistical analysis of official data, we quantify the nutrient retention contribution of wetlands for multiple sub-catchments in two Swedish Water Management Districts. We compare this with the retention contribution of two other landscape features: the waterborne transport distance and major lakes. The landscape-scale retention contribution of wetlands is undetectable; rather, the other two landscape features account for much of the total nutrient retention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative nutrient retention (rSC) for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) versus transport distance to the coast (km) for the PLC5 catchments (shown in Fig. 2) in the North Baltic WMD (left) and the South Baltic WMD (right). PLC5 catchments with surface water flow and nutrient transport pathways that go through a major lake en route to their coastal outlet are marked in purple, while other catchments are marked in yellow. Linear regression over all data points in each plot yields R2 values of 0.610 and 0.555 for TN and TP, respectively, in the North Baltic WMD, and R2 values of 0.598 and 0.364 for TN and TP, respectively, in the South Baltic WMD
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Fig5: Relative nutrient retention (rSC) for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) versus transport distance to the coast (km) for the PLC5 catchments (shown in Fig. 2) in the North Baltic WMD (left) and the South Baltic WMD (right). PLC5 catchments with surface water flow and nutrient transport pathways that go through a major lake en route to their coastal outlet are marked in purple, while other catchments are marked in yellow. Linear regression over all data points in each plot yields R2 values of 0.610 and 0.555 for TN and TP, respectively, in the North Baltic WMD, and R2 values of 0.598 and 0.364 for TN and TP, respectively, in the South Baltic WMD

Mentions: The retention contribution of wetlands located downstream of each PLC5 catchment outlet, within the smaller PLC5 sub-catchments lying along the transport pathways and whose area is normalized by the transport distance L to the coast, is also undetectable for the range of average cross-sectional wetland width of 0–1500 m that exists downstream of the PLC5 catchments (Fig. 4). However, the total nutrient retention does show correlation with the transport distance to the sea, L, itself (Fig. 5). In all but one case, more than 50 % of the variation of rSC for TN and TP in the different catchments is explicable by the simple L variable. For the exception—TP retention in the South Baltic WMD—the result is that 36 % of the total retention is explicable by L.Fig. 4


Dissecting the ecosystem service of large-scale pollutant retention: The role of wetlands and other landscape features.

Quin A, Jaramillo F, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Relative nutrient retention (rSC) for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) versus transport distance to the coast (km) for the PLC5 catchments (shown in Fig. 2) in the North Baltic WMD (left) and the South Baltic WMD (right). PLC5 catchments with surface water flow and nutrient transport pathways that go through a major lake en route to their coastal outlet are marked in purple, while other catchments are marked in yellow. Linear regression over all data points in each plot yields R2 values of 0.610 and 0.555 for TN and TP, respectively, in the North Baltic WMD, and R2 values of 0.598 and 0.364 for TN and TP, respectively, in the South Baltic WMD
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288994&req=5

Fig5: Relative nutrient retention (rSC) for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) versus transport distance to the coast (km) for the PLC5 catchments (shown in Fig. 2) in the North Baltic WMD (left) and the South Baltic WMD (right). PLC5 catchments with surface water flow and nutrient transport pathways that go through a major lake en route to their coastal outlet are marked in purple, while other catchments are marked in yellow. Linear regression over all data points in each plot yields R2 values of 0.610 and 0.555 for TN and TP, respectively, in the North Baltic WMD, and R2 values of 0.598 and 0.364 for TN and TP, respectively, in the South Baltic WMD
Mentions: The retention contribution of wetlands located downstream of each PLC5 catchment outlet, within the smaller PLC5 sub-catchments lying along the transport pathways and whose area is normalized by the transport distance L to the coast, is also undetectable for the range of average cross-sectional wetland width of 0–1500 m that exists downstream of the PLC5 catchments (Fig. 4). However, the total nutrient retention does show correlation with the transport distance to the sea, L, itself (Fig. 5). In all but one case, more than 50 % of the variation of rSC for TN and TP in the different catchments is explicable by the simple L variable. For the exception—TP retention in the South Baltic WMD—the result is that 36 % of the total retention is explicable by L.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Various features of a landscape contribute to the regulating ecosystem service of reducing waterborne pollutant loading to downstream environments.At local scales, wetlands have been shown to be effective in retaining pollutants.We develop a general analytical model which shows that the retention contribution of wetlands and other landscape features is only significant if a large fraction of the total waterborne pollutant transport passes through them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, andrew.quin@natgeo.su.se.

ABSTRACT
Various features of a landscape contribute to the regulating ecosystem service of reducing waterborne pollutant loading to downstream environments. At local scales, wetlands have been shown to be effective in retaining pollutants. Here, we investigate the landscape-scale contribution to pollutant retention provided by multiple wetlands. We develop a general analytical model which shows that the retention contribution of wetlands and other landscape features is only significant if a large fraction of the total waterborne pollutant transport passes through them. Next, by means of a statistical analysis of official data, we quantify the nutrient retention contribution of wetlands for multiple sub-catchments in two Swedish Water Management Districts. We compare this with the retention contribution of two other landscape features: the waterborne transport distance and major lakes. The landscape-scale retention contribution of wetlands is undetectable; rather, the other two landscape features account for much of the total nutrient retention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus