Limits...
Climate change effects on the Baltic Sea borderland between land and sea.

Strandmark A, Bring A, Cousins SA, Destouni G, Kautsky H, Kolb G, de la Torre-Castro M, Hambäck PA - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative.Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area.Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, alma.strandmark@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Coastal habitats are situated on the border between land and sea, and ecosystem structure and functioning is influenced by both marine and terrestrial processes. Despite this, most scientific studies and monitoring are conducted either with a terrestrial or an aquatic focus. To address issues concerning climate change impacts in coastal areas, a cross-ecosystem approach is necessary. Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative. Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area. Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

No MeSH data available.


Inter-annual variability of maximum extent of sea ice-sheet in the Baltic Sea between 1996 and 2004. Data from Baltic Sea portal (http://www.itameriportaali.fi/en/tietoa/jaa/jaatalvi/en_GB/2010/)
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Fig3: Inter-annual variability of maximum extent of sea ice-sheet in the Baltic Sea between 1996 and 2004. Data from Baltic Sea portal (http://www.itameriportaali.fi/en/tietoa/jaa/jaatalvi/en_GB/2010/)

Mentions: In comparison to salinity changes, changes in ice cover are projected with greater certainty. A large reduction in length of the ice-cover season, particularly in the central Baltic, is projected by several models (Graham et al. 2008). Experiments with the regional climate model RCAO suggest that average ice extent may decrease by 57–71 % by the end of the century (Meier et al. 2004b). The inter-annual variability in ice cover is large in the Baltic Sea (Fig. 3), and the most noticeable change will likely be a decrease in the frequency of severe ice winters. Regarding wind speed changes, results from regional climate model simulations vary substantially with the global climate model used to drive the regional climate modeling (Graham et al. 2008). Some relatively robust changes include a greater increase in average winter wind speed over the northern Baltic Sea (Fig. 3.24 in Graham et al. 2008). In contrast, projected summer wind speeds show opposite signs for different models (Fig. 3.25 in Graham et al. 2008).Fig. 3


Climate change effects on the Baltic Sea borderland between land and sea.

Strandmark A, Bring A, Cousins SA, Destouni G, Kautsky H, Kolb G, de la Torre-Castro M, Hambäck PA - Ambio (2015)

Inter-annual variability of maximum extent of sea ice-sheet in the Baltic Sea between 1996 and 2004. Data from Baltic Sea portal (http://www.itameriportaali.fi/en/tietoa/jaa/jaatalvi/en_GB/2010/)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288993&req=5

Fig3: Inter-annual variability of maximum extent of sea ice-sheet in the Baltic Sea between 1996 and 2004. Data from Baltic Sea portal (http://www.itameriportaali.fi/en/tietoa/jaa/jaatalvi/en_GB/2010/)
Mentions: In comparison to salinity changes, changes in ice cover are projected with greater certainty. A large reduction in length of the ice-cover season, particularly in the central Baltic, is projected by several models (Graham et al. 2008). Experiments with the regional climate model RCAO suggest that average ice extent may decrease by 57–71 % by the end of the century (Meier et al. 2004b). The inter-annual variability in ice cover is large in the Baltic Sea (Fig. 3), and the most noticeable change will likely be a decrease in the frequency of severe ice winters. Regarding wind speed changes, results from regional climate model simulations vary substantially with the global climate model used to drive the regional climate modeling (Graham et al. 2008). Some relatively robust changes include a greater increase in average winter wind speed over the northern Baltic Sea (Fig. 3.24 in Graham et al. 2008). In contrast, projected summer wind speeds show opposite signs for different models (Fig. 3.25 in Graham et al. 2008).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative.Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area.Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, alma.strandmark@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Coastal habitats are situated on the border between land and sea, and ecosystem structure and functioning is influenced by both marine and terrestrial processes. Despite this, most scientific studies and monitoring are conducted either with a terrestrial or an aquatic focus. To address issues concerning climate change impacts in coastal areas, a cross-ecosystem approach is necessary. Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative. Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area. Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

No MeSH data available.