Limits...
Climate change effects on the Baltic Sea borderland between land and sea.

Strandmark A, Bring A, Cousins SA, Destouni G, Kautsky H, Kolb G, de la Torre-Castro M, Hambäck PA - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative.Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area.Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, alma.strandmark@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Coastal habitats are situated on the border between land and sea, and ecosystem structure and functioning is influenced by both marine and terrestrial processes. Despite this, most scientific studies and monitoring are conducted either with a terrestrial or an aquatic focus. To address issues concerning climate change impacts in coastal areas, a cross-ecosystem approach is necessary. Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative. Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area. Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic illustration of monitored and unmonitored pathways of water flow and waterborne nutrient/pollutant transport across the coastal boundary. Solid and dottedblacklines are water divides of monitored (green) and unmonitored (gray) parts of coastal catchments. Red-filledcircles show the most-near coastal monitoring stations that define these catchment parts. Straightflowarrows at and across the coastline boundary illustrate monitored (blueflowarrows) and unmonitored (orangeflowarrows) freshwater discharges from land to sea. Turquoisecurvedflow arrows across the coastline boundary illustrate the re-circulated seawater component of submarine groundwater discharge. Bluelines within the catchments show rivers and streams, and blue and orangeflowarrows into them illustrate the groundwater flow into monitored rivers and unmonitored streams, respectively. Modified from Destouni et al. (2008)
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Fig2: Schematic illustration of monitored and unmonitored pathways of water flow and waterborne nutrient/pollutant transport across the coastal boundary. Solid and dottedblacklines are water divides of monitored (green) and unmonitored (gray) parts of coastal catchments. Red-filledcircles show the most-near coastal monitoring stations that define these catchment parts. Straightflowarrows at and across the coastline boundary illustrate monitored (blueflowarrows) and unmonitored (orangeflowarrows) freshwater discharges from land to sea. Turquoisecurvedflow arrows across the coastline boundary illustrate the re-circulated seawater component of submarine groundwater discharge. Bluelines within the catchments show rivers and streams, and blue and orangeflowarrows into them illustrate the groundwater flow into monitored rivers and unmonitored streams, respectively. Modified from Destouni et al. (2008)

Mentions: Net changes in sea level also interact with other geophysical and biogeochemical processes along the coast. For instance, increased seawater intrusion into coastal groundwater may result from rising sea levels, as well as decreasing flow of fresh groundwater to the coast (Mazi et al. 2013). The water discharges across the coastal boundary are complex combinations and mixtures of water flow through various pathways (Fig. 2), implying a risk of underestimating the total land-to-sea fluxes (Destouni et al. 2008). Climate change will have consequences for the different water discharges (Destouni et al. 2013), soil water dynamics (Destouni and Verrot 2014), and waterborne nutrient and pollutant loads from land to the sea (Darracq et al. 2005), which will in turn also present society with significant management challenges in the coastal zone.Fig. 2


Climate change effects on the Baltic Sea borderland between land and sea.

Strandmark A, Bring A, Cousins SA, Destouni G, Kautsky H, Kolb G, de la Torre-Castro M, Hambäck PA - Ambio (2015)

Schematic illustration of monitored and unmonitored pathways of water flow and waterborne nutrient/pollutant transport across the coastal boundary. Solid and dottedblacklines are water divides of monitored (green) and unmonitored (gray) parts of coastal catchments. Red-filledcircles show the most-near coastal monitoring stations that define these catchment parts. Straightflowarrows at and across the coastline boundary illustrate monitored (blueflowarrows) and unmonitored (orangeflowarrows) freshwater discharges from land to sea. Turquoisecurvedflow arrows across the coastline boundary illustrate the re-circulated seawater component of submarine groundwater discharge. Bluelines within the catchments show rivers and streams, and blue and orangeflowarrows into them illustrate the groundwater flow into monitored rivers and unmonitored streams, respectively. Modified from Destouni et al. (2008)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288993&req=5

Fig2: Schematic illustration of monitored and unmonitored pathways of water flow and waterborne nutrient/pollutant transport across the coastal boundary. Solid and dottedblacklines are water divides of monitored (green) and unmonitored (gray) parts of coastal catchments. Red-filledcircles show the most-near coastal monitoring stations that define these catchment parts. Straightflowarrows at and across the coastline boundary illustrate monitored (blueflowarrows) and unmonitored (orangeflowarrows) freshwater discharges from land to sea. Turquoisecurvedflow arrows across the coastline boundary illustrate the re-circulated seawater component of submarine groundwater discharge. Bluelines within the catchments show rivers and streams, and blue and orangeflowarrows into them illustrate the groundwater flow into monitored rivers and unmonitored streams, respectively. Modified from Destouni et al. (2008)
Mentions: Net changes in sea level also interact with other geophysical and biogeochemical processes along the coast. For instance, increased seawater intrusion into coastal groundwater may result from rising sea levels, as well as decreasing flow of fresh groundwater to the coast (Mazi et al. 2013). The water discharges across the coastal boundary are complex combinations and mixtures of water flow through various pathways (Fig. 2), implying a risk of underestimating the total land-to-sea fluxes (Destouni et al. 2008). Climate change will have consequences for the different water discharges (Destouni et al. 2013), soil water dynamics (Destouni and Verrot 2014), and waterborne nutrient and pollutant loads from land to the sea (Darracq et al. 2005), which will in turn also present society with significant management challenges in the coastal zone.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative.Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area.Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, alma.strandmark@su.se.

ABSTRACT
Coastal habitats are situated on the border between land and sea, and ecosystem structure and functioning is influenced by both marine and terrestrial processes. Despite this, most scientific studies and monitoring are conducted either with a terrestrial or an aquatic focus. To address issues concerning climate change impacts in coastal areas, a cross-ecosystem approach is necessary. Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative. Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area. Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

No MeSH data available.