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Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Bottom Line: AM fungal hyphae showed significantly different rates of growth and dieback over a period of 24 h and paralleled the circadian-driven photosynthetic oscillations observed in plants.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.Changes in the environmental conditions and variability of the mycorrhizosphere may alter the diurnal patterns of productivity of AM fungi, thereby modifying soil carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling and host plant success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

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Mean total relative hyphal length (gray squares; mm mm−3 soil) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi during the month of May 2009 and 2010. Error bars are ± 1SE. Soil temperature (gray circles; °C) and soil water content (blue circles; mm mm−3 × 102) at 16 cm depth on secondary y-axis with solid lines showing ± 1SD.
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fig05: Mean total relative hyphal length (gray squares; mm mm−3 soil) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi during the month of May 2009 and 2010. Error bars are ± 1SE. Soil temperature (gray circles; °C) and soil water content (blue circles; mm mm−3 × 102) at 16 cm depth on secondary y-axis with solid lines showing ± 1SD.

Mentions: Overall, the rates of dieback of AM fungal hyphae during both campaigns were approximately two-fold greater than hyphal growth at c. −104 vs 68 μm mm−3 soil h−1, respectively, averaged across all intervals, for a net production rate of −36 μm mm−3 soil h−1 (Fig.5). This disparity resulted in a net reduction in length. Specifically, the total length was reduced by over one-half throughout both the 2009 and 2010 May campaigns (e.g. from c. 36 to 18 mm3 mm−3 soil). A net reduction in length for the month of May parallels our findings of net negative AM fungal hyphal rates calculated at the diurnal scale.


Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Mean total relative hyphal length (gray squares; mm mm−3 soil) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi during the month of May 2009 and 2010. Error bars are ± 1SE. Soil temperature (gray circles; °C) and soil water content (blue circles; mm mm−3 × 102) at 16 cm depth on secondary y-axis with solid lines showing ± 1SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288973&req=5

fig05: Mean total relative hyphal length (gray squares; mm mm−3 soil) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi during the month of May 2009 and 2010. Error bars are ± 1SE. Soil temperature (gray circles; °C) and soil water content (blue circles; mm mm−3 × 102) at 16 cm depth on secondary y-axis with solid lines showing ± 1SD.
Mentions: Overall, the rates of dieback of AM fungal hyphae during both campaigns were approximately two-fold greater than hyphal growth at c. −104 vs 68 μm mm−3 soil h−1, respectively, averaged across all intervals, for a net production rate of −36 μm mm−3 soil h−1 (Fig.5). This disparity resulted in a net reduction in length. Specifically, the total length was reduced by over one-half throughout both the 2009 and 2010 May campaigns (e.g. from c. 36 to 18 mm3 mm−3 soil). A net reduction in length for the month of May parallels our findings of net negative AM fungal hyphal rates calculated at the diurnal scale.

Bottom Line: AM fungal hyphae showed significantly different rates of growth and dieback over a period of 24 h and paralleled the circadian-driven photosynthetic oscillations observed in plants.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.Changes in the environmental conditions and variability of the mycorrhizosphere may alter the diurnal patterns of productivity of AM fungi, thereby modifying soil carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling and host plant success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

Show MeSH