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Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Bottom Line: We employed the in situ Soil Ecosystem Observatory to quantify the rates of diurnal growth, dieback and net productivity of extra-radical AM fungi.The greatest rates (and incidences) of growth and dieback occurred between noon and 18:00 h.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

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Mean relative diurnal (a) productivity (gray circles; μm mm−3 soil h−1) and rates of (b) growth (green circles) and dieback (brown circles) as a function of the mean photosynthetic photon flux density (gray circles; μmol m−2 soil s−1) during four 6-h intervals within a 24-h day: 00:00–05:59 h (I), 06:00–11:59 h (II), 12:00–17:59 h (III) and 18:00–23:59 h (IV). Circle size is proportional and indicative of the number of growth and dieback events (i.e. independent of the rate of change; gray, both growth and dieback events; green, growth events; brown, dieback events) of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae throughout the four day : night intervals.
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fig04: Mean relative diurnal (a) productivity (gray circles; μm mm−3 soil h−1) and rates of (b) growth (green circles) and dieback (brown circles) as a function of the mean photosynthetic photon flux density (gray circles; μmol m−2 soil s−1) during four 6-h intervals within a 24-h day: 00:00–05:59 h (I), 06:00–11:59 h (II), 12:00–17:59 h (III) and 18:00–23:59 h (IV). Circle size is proportional and indicative of the number of growth and dieback events (i.e. independent of the rate of change; gray, both growth and dieback events; green, growth events; brown, dieback events) of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae throughout the four day : night intervals.

Mentions: We also found that the frequency (i.e. counts) of growth and dieback events was significantly different across the four 6-h day : night intervals, independent of the rate of change (Fig.4a; χ2 = 31.803, df = 3, P < 0.0001). The greatest activity – in both directions (i.e. growth and dieback) – was observed in intervals III (12:00–17:59 h) and IV (18:00–23:59 h), whereas only 10.0% of all activity was observed in interval II. Analyzed separately, growth and dieback events showed the same pattern across the 6-h intervals, where the greatest number of events occurred during intervals III and IV, and the least in interval II (Fig.4b; χ2 = 16.694, df = 3, P < 0.0008 and χ2 = 19.679, df = 3, P < 0.0002, respectively).


Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Mean relative diurnal (a) productivity (gray circles; μm mm−3 soil h−1) and rates of (b) growth (green circles) and dieback (brown circles) as a function of the mean photosynthetic photon flux density (gray circles; μmol m−2 soil s−1) during four 6-h intervals within a 24-h day: 00:00–05:59 h (I), 06:00–11:59 h (II), 12:00–17:59 h (III) and 18:00–23:59 h (IV). Circle size is proportional and indicative of the number of growth and dieback events (i.e. independent of the rate of change; gray, both growth and dieback events; green, growth events; brown, dieback events) of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae throughout the four day : night intervals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288973&req=5

fig04: Mean relative diurnal (a) productivity (gray circles; μm mm−3 soil h−1) and rates of (b) growth (green circles) and dieback (brown circles) as a function of the mean photosynthetic photon flux density (gray circles; μmol m−2 soil s−1) during four 6-h intervals within a 24-h day: 00:00–05:59 h (I), 06:00–11:59 h (II), 12:00–17:59 h (III) and 18:00–23:59 h (IV). Circle size is proportional and indicative of the number of growth and dieback events (i.e. independent of the rate of change; gray, both growth and dieback events; green, growth events; brown, dieback events) of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae throughout the four day : night intervals.
Mentions: We also found that the frequency (i.e. counts) of growth and dieback events was significantly different across the four 6-h day : night intervals, independent of the rate of change (Fig.4a; χ2 = 31.803, df = 3, P < 0.0001). The greatest activity – in both directions (i.e. growth and dieback) – was observed in intervals III (12:00–17:59 h) and IV (18:00–23:59 h), whereas only 10.0% of all activity was observed in interval II. Analyzed separately, growth and dieback events showed the same pattern across the 6-h intervals, where the greatest number of events occurred during intervals III and IV, and the least in interval II (Fig.4b; χ2 = 16.694, df = 3, P < 0.0008 and χ2 = 19.679, df = 3, P < 0.0002, respectively).

Bottom Line: We employed the in situ Soil Ecosystem Observatory to quantify the rates of diurnal growth, dieback and net productivity of extra-radical AM fungi.The greatest rates (and incidences) of growth and dieback occurred between noon and 18:00 h.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus