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Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Bottom Line: We employed the in situ Soil Ecosystem Observatory to quantify the rates of diurnal growth, dieback and net productivity of extra-radical AM fungi.The greatest rates (and incidences) of growth and dieback occurred between noon and 18:00 h.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

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Belowground image (3.01 × 2.26 mm2) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae captured with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory (SEO). The SEO was installed in a mixed conifer forest at the James San Jacinto Mountains Reserve, which operates as a field site for the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (Idyllwild, CA, USA). The image was taken at × 100 magnification; bar, 1 mm.
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fig02: Belowground image (3.01 × 2.26 mm2) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae captured with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory (SEO). The SEO was installed in a mixed conifer forest at the James San Jacinto Mountains Reserve, which operates as a field site for the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (Idyllwild, CA, USA). The image was taken at × 100 magnification; bar, 1 mm.

Mentions: We found that the diurnal dynamics of AM fungal hyphae were visible – producing images of in situ and extra-radical AM fungal hyphae (Fig.2) – and quantifiable with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory. Using this new technology, we found that the rates of relative growth and dieback of AM fungal hyphae were significantly different across the four 6-h intervals comprising a 24-h day : night cycle (Fig.3; Kruskal–Wallis χ2 = 25.505, df = 3, P < 0.0001 (production); Kruskal–Wallis χ2 = 77.5848, df = 3, P < 0.0001 (mortality)). Peak growth rates of AM fungal hyphae occurred between 12:00 and 17:59 h, with a mean growth rate of 154 μm mm−3 soil h−1. This rate of growth was approximately four times greater than the growth observed in other intervals, which ranged from 27 to 47 μm mm−3 soil h−1. Similar to growth, the relative dieback rates of AM fungal hyphae were greatest between 12:00 and 17:59 h, and slightly greater than growth (170 μm mm−3 soil h−1). Dieback in nonpeak intervals ranged from 63 to 102 μm mm−3 soil h−1. Hyphal dieback and growth showed a clear minimum in the morning (i.e. 00:00–06:00 h) with rates of 63 and 27 μm mm−3 soil h−1, respectively.


Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.

Hernandez RR, Allen MF - New Phytol. (2013)

Belowground image (3.01 × 2.26 mm2) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae captured with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory (SEO). The SEO was installed in a mixed conifer forest at the James San Jacinto Mountains Reserve, which operates as a field site for the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (Idyllwild, CA, USA). The image was taken at × 100 magnification; bar, 1 mm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288973&req=5

fig02: Belowground image (3.01 × 2.26 mm2) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae captured with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory (SEO). The SEO was installed in a mixed conifer forest at the James San Jacinto Mountains Reserve, which operates as a field site for the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (Idyllwild, CA, USA). The image was taken at × 100 magnification; bar, 1 mm.
Mentions: We found that the diurnal dynamics of AM fungal hyphae were visible – producing images of in situ and extra-radical AM fungal hyphae (Fig.2) – and quantifiable with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory. Using this new technology, we found that the rates of relative growth and dieback of AM fungal hyphae were significantly different across the four 6-h intervals comprising a 24-h day : night cycle (Fig.3; Kruskal–Wallis χ2 = 25.505, df = 3, P < 0.0001 (production); Kruskal–Wallis χ2 = 77.5848, df = 3, P < 0.0001 (mortality)). Peak growth rates of AM fungal hyphae occurred between 12:00 and 17:59 h, with a mean growth rate of 154 μm mm−3 soil h−1. This rate of growth was approximately four times greater than the growth observed in other intervals, which ranged from 27 to 47 μm mm−3 soil h−1. Similar to growth, the relative dieback rates of AM fungal hyphae were greatest between 12:00 and 17:59 h, and slightly greater than growth (170 μm mm−3 soil h−1). Dieback in nonpeak intervals ranged from 63 to 102 μm mm−3 soil h−1. Hyphal dieback and growth showed a clear minimum in the morning (i.e. 00:00–06:00 h) with rates of 63 and 27 μm mm−3 soil h−1, respectively.

Bottom Line: We employed the in situ Soil Ecosystem Observatory to quantify the rates of diurnal growth, dieback and net productivity of extra-radical AM fungi.The greatest rates (and incidences) of growth and dieback occurred between noon and 18:00 h.Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus