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Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in Ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping.

Deribe K, Brooker SJ, Pullan RL, Sime H, Gebretsadik A, Assefa A, Kebede A, Hailu A, Rebollo MP, Shafi O, Bockarie MJ, Aseffa A, Reithinger R, Cano J, Enquselassie F, Newport MJ, Davey G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, being female, older, unmarried, washing the feet less frequently than daily, and being semiskilled or unemployed were significantly associated with increased risk of podoconiosis.Attending formal education and living in a house with a covered floor were associated with decreased risk of podoconiosis.Podoconiosis exhibits marked geographical variation across Ethiopia, with variation in risk associated with variation in rainfall, enhanced vegetation index, and altitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, United Kingdom; School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Center for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute/ALERT, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; RTI International, Washington, DC kebededeka@yahoo.com.

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Graph showing age at first shoe use by age among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The graph shows a decreasing secular trend of age at first wearing shoes: the younger age groups tend to start wearing shoes at an earlier age than the older age groups.
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Figure 5: Graph showing age at first shoe use by age among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The graph shows a decreasing secular trend of age at first wearing shoes: the younger age groups tend to start wearing shoes at an earlier age than the older age groups.

Mentions: In our study, the prevalence of podoconiosis increased steadily with age, and high prevalence of podoconiosis was found among individuals 65 years of age or above. Previous studies in Ethiopia have also documented prevalence increasing with age,12,14,20,22,23,26 as have studies in Uganda24 and Cameroon.25 Given that podoconiosis is a chronic condition and that most patients and health professionals are unaware that treatment is possible, it is to be expected that prevalence increases with age. Other factors that may be important include cumulative exposure to the putative causes over an individual's life and changes in shoe wearing practices. This study indicates a linear decrease in the age at first shoe use by age category (Figure 5Figure 5.


Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in Ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping.

Deribe K, Brooker SJ, Pullan RL, Sime H, Gebretsadik A, Assefa A, Kebede A, Hailu A, Rebollo MP, Shafi O, Bockarie MJ, Aseffa A, Reithinger R, Cano J, Enquselassie F, Newport MJ, Davey G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Graph showing age at first shoe use by age among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The graph shows a decreasing secular trend of age at first wearing shoes: the younger age groups tend to start wearing shoes at an earlier age than the older age groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288951&req=5

Figure 5: Graph showing age at first shoe use by age among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The graph shows a decreasing secular trend of age at first wearing shoes: the younger age groups tend to start wearing shoes at an earlier age than the older age groups.
Mentions: In our study, the prevalence of podoconiosis increased steadily with age, and high prevalence of podoconiosis was found among individuals 65 years of age or above. Previous studies in Ethiopia have also documented prevalence increasing with age,12,14,20,22,23,26 as have studies in Uganda24 and Cameroon.25 Given that podoconiosis is a chronic condition and that most patients and health professionals are unaware that treatment is possible, it is to be expected that prevalence increases with age. Other factors that may be important include cumulative exposure to the putative causes over an individual's life and changes in shoe wearing practices. This study indicates a linear decrease in the age at first shoe use by age category (Figure 5Figure 5.

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, being female, older, unmarried, washing the feet less frequently than daily, and being semiskilled or unemployed were significantly associated with increased risk of podoconiosis.Attending formal education and living in a house with a covered floor were associated with decreased risk of podoconiosis.Podoconiosis exhibits marked geographical variation across Ethiopia, with variation in risk associated with variation in rainfall, enhanced vegetation index, and altitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, United Kingdom; School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Center for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute/ALERT, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; RTI International, Washington, DC kebededeka@yahoo.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus