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Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in Ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping.

Deribe K, Brooker SJ, Pullan RL, Sime H, Gebretsadik A, Assefa A, Kebede A, Hailu A, Rebollo MP, Shafi O, Bockarie MJ, Aseffa A, Reithinger R, Cano J, Enquselassie F, Newport MJ, Davey G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, being female, older, unmarried, washing the feet less frequently than daily, and being semiskilled or unemployed were significantly associated with increased risk of podoconiosis.Attending formal education and living in a house with a covered floor were associated with decreased risk of podoconiosis.Podoconiosis exhibits marked geographical variation across Ethiopia, with variation in risk associated with variation in rainfall, enhanced vegetation index, and altitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, United Kingdom; School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Center for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute/ALERT, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; RTI International, Washington, DC kebededeka@yahoo.com.

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Age and sex disaggregated prevalence of podoconiosis among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The two graphs show that as age increases, the prevalence of podoconiosis increases. Higher prevalence is recorded among females in all age categories as compared to males.
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Figure 3: Age and sex disaggregated prevalence of podoconiosis among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The two graphs show that as age increases, the prevalence of podoconiosis increases. Higher prevalence is recorded among females in all age categories as compared to males.

Mentions: In total, 8,110 individuals with lymphoedema of the lower limb were identified. The overall prevalence of lower limb lymphoedema was 6.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1–6.4%), with a significant difference in prevalence between men (5.3%, 95% CI 5.2–5.5%), and women (7.1%, 95% CI 6.9–7.3%). Of the 8,110 lymphoedema cases of the lower limb, 24 (0.3%) were found to be ICT positive, 268 (3.3%) had swelling of the descending type, starting from higher up in the leg, and 782 (9.6%) had groin involvement. Based on the clinical algorithm for podoconiosis diagnosis a total of 2,833 lymphoedema cases were considered because of other etiologies and were consequently excluded from the analyses. Thus, the total number of people with podoconiosis was 5,253 (Figure 2), with overall podoconiosis prevalence being 4.0% (95% CI; 3.9–4.1%); prevalence among men and women was 3.4% (95% CI 3.3–3.5%), and 4.7% (95% CI 4.5–4.8%), respectively, and prevalence increased with age (P < 0.001) (Figure 3).


Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in Ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping.

Deribe K, Brooker SJ, Pullan RL, Sime H, Gebretsadik A, Assefa A, Kebede A, Hailu A, Rebollo MP, Shafi O, Bockarie MJ, Aseffa A, Reithinger R, Cano J, Enquselassie F, Newport MJ, Davey G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Age and sex disaggregated prevalence of podoconiosis among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The two graphs show that as age increases, the prevalence of podoconiosis increases. Higher prevalence is recorded among females in all age categories as compared to males.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288951&req=5

Figure 3: Age and sex disaggregated prevalence of podoconiosis among adults 15 years of age and above in Ethiopia. The two graphs show that as age increases, the prevalence of podoconiosis increases. Higher prevalence is recorded among females in all age categories as compared to males.
Mentions: In total, 8,110 individuals with lymphoedema of the lower limb were identified. The overall prevalence of lower limb lymphoedema was 6.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1–6.4%), with a significant difference in prevalence between men (5.3%, 95% CI 5.2–5.5%), and women (7.1%, 95% CI 6.9–7.3%). Of the 8,110 lymphoedema cases of the lower limb, 24 (0.3%) were found to be ICT positive, 268 (3.3%) had swelling of the descending type, starting from higher up in the leg, and 782 (9.6%) had groin involvement. Based on the clinical algorithm for podoconiosis diagnosis a total of 2,833 lymphoedema cases were considered because of other etiologies and were consequently excluded from the analyses. Thus, the total number of people with podoconiosis was 5,253 (Figure 2), with overall podoconiosis prevalence being 4.0% (95% CI; 3.9–4.1%); prevalence among men and women was 3.4% (95% CI 3.3–3.5%), and 4.7% (95% CI 4.5–4.8%), respectively, and prevalence increased with age (P < 0.001) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In multivariable analysis, being female, older, unmarried, washing the feet less frequently than daily, and being semiskilled or unemployed were significantly associated with increased risk of podoconiosis.Attending formal education and living in a house with a covered floor were associated with decreased risk of podoconiosis.Podoconiosis exhibits marked geographical variation across Ethiopia, with variation in risk associated with variation in rainfall, enhanced vegetation index, and altitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, United Kingdom; School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Center for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Armauer Hansen Research Institute/ALERT, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; RTI International, Washington, DC kebededeka@yahoo.com.

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Related in: MedlinePlus