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Lipoblastoma mimicking inguinal hernia.

Sarsu SB, Karakus SC, Belen B - APSP J Case Rep (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Gaziantep Children's Hospital, Turkey.

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Lipoblastoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor occurring mostly in infancy and early childhood... Adipose tissue tumors constitute about 6% of all soft tissue neoplasms in children and lipoblastoma accounts for only 5 to 30% of adipose tissue tumors.[1-3] Many patients present with a painless mass, which lead to misdiagnosis... She had a history of right inguinal hernia repair 8 months ago (operative notes were not available)... On physical examination, a non-tender, mobile and irreducible (2x3 cm) swelling was noted... At operation, there was no recurrence of inguinal hernia and the inguinal swelling was more like a mass... The tumor was completely excised, with the resulting specimen of 4 x 2.5 x 2cm, with no invasion into the surrounding tissues... Lipoblastomatous tumors are rare, benign adipose tissue tumors of infancy and childhood... Ninety percent of reported cases are under the age of three years and 55% less than 1 year of age.[3] Histopathologically, these tumors are classified into two forms as lipoblastoma (circumscribed type) and lipoblastomatosis (diffuse, multicentric and infiltrative type).[4] The inguinal region is an uncommon location for this tumor.[2] Because of the nonspecific presentation of lipoblastomas, they are often mistaken for other conditions.[5] The previous operation on the same side may point to a possible recurrence, however, the history and physical examination did not correlate with recurrence as it was a progressive swelling and was of significant size... Ultrasound which was reported as normal could have differentiated between a fatty mass and a firm structure like ovary, however, this modality could not help us... Patients with lipoblastoma usually have a good prognosis despite the tumor's potential to invade locally and grow rapidly.[2] Post-operative follow-up is important to detect relapses but appropriate length of follow-up is controversial... Nil None declared

No MeSH data available.


Figure 1:Histopathologically predominantly vacuolated lipoblasts mixed with spindled cells, with a fibrous capsule noted.
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Figure 1: Figure 1:Histopathologically predominantly vacuolated lipoblasts mixed with spindled cells, with a fibrous capsule noted.


Lipoblastoma mimicking inguinal hernia.

Sarsu SB, Karakus SC, Belen B - APSP J Case Rep (2015)

Figure 1:Histopathologically predominantly vacuolated lipoblasts mixed with spindled cells, with a fibrous capsule noted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288838&req=5

Figure 1: Figure 1:Histopathologically predominantly vacuolated lipoblasts mixed with spindled cells, with a fibrous capsule noted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Gaziantep Children's Hospital, Turkey.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Lipoblastoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor occurring mostly in infancy and early childhood... Adipose tissue tumors constitute about 6% of all soft tissue neoplasms in children and lipoblastoma accounts for only 5 to 30% of adipose tissue tumors.[1-3] Many patients present with a painless mass, which lead to misdiagnosis... She had a history of right inguinal hernia repair 8 months ago (operative notes were not available)... On physical examination, a non-tender, mobile and irreducible (2x3 cm) swelling was noted... At operation, there was no recurrence of inguinal hernia and the inguinal swelling was more like a mass... The tumor was completely excised, with the resulting specimen of 4 x 2.5 x 2cm, with no invasion into the surrounding tissues... Lipoblastomatous tumors are rare, benign adipose tissue tumors of infancy and childhood... Ninety percent of reported cases are under the age of three years and 55% less than 1 year of age.[3] Histopathologically, these tumors are classified into two forms as lipoblastoma (circumscribed type) and lipoblastomatosis (diffuse, multicentric and infiltrative type).[4] The inguinal region is an uncommon location for this tumor.[2] Because of the nonspecific presentation of lipoblastomas, they are often mistaken for other conditions.[5] The previous operation on the same side may point to a possible recurrence, however, the history and physical examination did not correlate with recurrence as it was a progressive swelling and was of significant size... Ultrasound which was reported as normal could have differentiated between a fatty mass and a firm structure like ovary, however, this modality could not help us... Patients with lipoblastoma usually have a good prognosis despite the tumor's potential to invade locally and grow rapidly.[2] Post-operative follow-up is important to detect relapses but appropriate length of follow-up is controversial... Nil None declared

No MeSH data available.