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150 years of the mass action law.

Voit EO, Martens HA, Omholt SW - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate.It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases.The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the law of mass action. This law is often assumed to have been "there" forever, but it has its own history, background, and a definite starting point. The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate. It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases. The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical prototype for a model describing the spread of an infectious disease.S, I, and R describe pools of susceptible, infected, and recovered individuals. Susceptible individuals only become sick as the result of contact with an infected person.
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pcbi-1004012-g002: Typical prototype for a model describing the spread of an infectious disease.S, I, and R describe pools of susceptible, infected, and recovered individuals. Susceptible individuals only become sick as the result of contact with an infected person.

Mentions: Mathematical epidemiologists often study the spread of an infection with some variation of the so-called SIR or SIRS model [38], which describes the dynamics of susceptible (S), infective (I), and recovered (R) individuals, as diagrammed in Fig. 2.


150 years of the mass action law.

Voit EO, Martens HA, Omholt SW - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

Typical prototype for a model describing the spread of an infectious disease.S, I, and R describe pools of susceptible, infected, and recovered individuals. Susceptible individuals only become sick as the result of contact with an infected person.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288704&req=5

pcbi-1004012-g002: Typical prototype for a model describing the spread of an infectious disease.S, I, and R describe pools of susceptible, infected, and recovered individuals. Susceptible individuals only become sick as the result of contact with an infected person.
Mentions: Mathematical epidemiologists often study the spread of an infection with some variation of the so-called SIR or SIRS model [38], which describes the dynamics of susceptible (S), infective (I), and recovered (R) individuals, as diagrammed in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate.It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases.The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the law of mass action. This law is often assumed to have been "there" forever, but it has its own history, background, and a definite starting point. The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate. It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases. The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus