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150 years of the mass action law.

Voit EO, Martens HA, Omholt SW - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate.It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases.The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the law of mass action. This law is often assumed to have been "there" forever, but it has its own history, background, and a definite starting point. The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate. It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases. The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

Show MeSH
Diagram of a typical Michaelis-Menten reaction, in which an enzyme, E, catalyzes the conversion of a substrate, S, into a product, P, via the formation of an intermediate complex, ES.The indexed quantities, k, denote reaction rates.
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pcbi-1004012-g001: Diagram of a typical Michaelis-Menten reaction, in which an enzyme, E, catalyzes the conversion of a substrate, S, into a product, P, via the formation of an intermediate complex, ES.The indexed quantities, k, denote reaction rates.

Mentions: The most prevalent model in biochemistry is the Michaelis-Menten rate law (MMRL) [30](6)which describes a single-substrate, enzyme-catalyzed reaction that may be diagrammed as shown in Fig. 1. The format of MMRL in Equation 6 is the result of a useful approximation of a system of three differential equations, namely,(7)In this direct mathematical formulation of the diagram in Fig. 1, all terms follow the mass action format developed by Guldberg and Waage [3]. Even if inhibitors are included in the process, the same model design strategies hold, and one either obtains a formulation corresponding to the approximation in Equation 6 or a set of differential equations that again exclusively contain processes in mass action format [31].


150 years of the mass action law.

Voit EO, Martens HA, Omholt SW - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

Diagram of a typical Michaelis-Menten reaction, in which an enzyme, E, catalyzes the conversion of a substrate, S, into a product, P, via the formation of an intermediate complex, ES.The indexed quantities, k, denote reaction rates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288704&req=5

pcbi-1004012-g001: Diagram of a typical Michaelis-Menten reaction, in which an enzyme, E, catalyzes the conversion of a substrate, S, into a product, P, via the formation of an intermediate complex, ES.The indexed quantities, k, denote reaction rates.
Mentions: The most prevalent model in biochemistry is the Michaelis-Menten rate law (MMRL) [30](6)which describes a single-substrate, enzyme-catalyzed reaction that may be diagrammed as shown in Fig. 1. The format of MMRL in Equation 6 is the result of a useful approximation of a system of three differential equations, namely,(7)In this direct mathematical formulation of the diagram in Fig. 1, all terms follow the mass action format developed by Guldberg and Waage [3]. Even if inhibitors are included in the process, the same model design strategies hold, and one either obtains a formulation corresponding to the approximation in Equation 6 or a set of differential equations that again exclusively contain processes in mass action format [31].

Bottom Line: The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate.It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases.The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the law of mass action. This law is often assumed to have been "there" forever, but it has its own history, background, and a definite starting point. The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate. It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases. The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

Show MeSH