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The relationship between medical student learning opportunities and preparedness for practice: a questionnaire study.

Burford B, Whittle V, Vance GH - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Bottom Line: A significant challenge is to provide safe learning opportunities that will optimise students' preparedness to start work.Real-life experience was a better predictor of preparedness than simulated practice.The format and facilitation of placements may need to be addressed in order to enhance the quality of experience during final year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medical Education, Newcastle University, Ridley Building 1, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. bryan.burford@newcastle.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Alongside providing a knowledge base and practical skills, undergraduate medical education must prepare graduates to immediately begin practice as qualified doctors. A significant challenge is to provide safe learning opportunities that will optimise students' preparedness to start work. This study examined UK graduates' preparedness for clinical practice, and their exposure to real-life and simulated immediate care scenarios during final year placements.

Method: A questionnaire measuring students' perceived preparedness, and their exposure to immediate care scenarios, was distributed to all new Foundation Year 1 doctors (F1s) attending an induction session in one region of the UK.

Results: 356 F1s responded to the questionnaire (91% response rate; 89% of cohort) and data from 344 graduates of UK medical schools were analysed. Respondents were generally prepared for practice, but many reported few 'hands-on' experiences of providing immediate care during final year placements (a median of 1-2 experiences).Those who had 1-2 experiences reported no greater preparedness for acute management than those reporting no experience. Several exposures are necessary for a significant increase in perceived preparedness. Real-life experience was a better predictor of preparedness than simulated practice.

Conclusions: Gaps still remain in medical students' acute care experience, with a direct relationship to their perceived preparedness. The format and facilitation of placements may need to be addressed in order to enhance the quality of experience during final year.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Preparedness to manage acute patients plotted against perceived opportunity to manage acutely ill patients.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Preparedness to manage acute patients plotted against perceived opportunity to manage acutely ill patients.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows how reported preparedness on this item increases with reported opportunity to manage acutely unwell patients. The difference between the levels of experience are significant by Kruskall-Wallis test (X = 38.1468, p < 0.001). This supports the intuitive expectation that greater (perceived) experience leads to greater preparedness.


The relationship between medical student learning opportunities and preparedness for practice: a questionnaire study.

Burford B, Whittle V, Vance GH - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Preparedness to manage acute patients plotted against perceived opportunity to manage acutely ill patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288662&req=5

Fig1: Preparedness to manage acute patients plotted against perceived opportunity to manage acutely ill patients.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows how reported preparedness on this item increases with reported opportunity to manage acutely unwell patients. The difference between the levels of experience are significant by Kruskall-Wallis test (X = 38.1468, p < 0.001). This supports the intuitive expectation that greater (perceived) experience leads to greater preparedness.

Bottom Line: A significant challenge is to provide safe learning opportunities that will optimise students' preparedness to start work.Real-life experience was a better predictor of preparedness than simulated practice.The format and facilitation of placements may need to be addressed in order to enhance the quality of experience during final year.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medical Education, Newcastle University, Ridley Building 1, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. bryan.burford@newcastle.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Alongside providing a knowledge base and practical skills, undergraduate medical education must prepare graduates to immediately begin practice as qualified doctors. A significant challenge is to provide safe learning opportunities that will optimise students' preparedness to start work. This study examined UK graduates' preparedness for clinical practice, and their exposure to real-life and simulated immediate care scenarios during final year placements.

Method: A questionnaire measuring students' perceived preparedness, and their exposure to immediate care scenarios, was distributed to all new Foundation Year 1 doctors (F1s) attending an induction session in one region of the UK.

Results: 356 F1s responded to the questionnaire (91% response rate; 89% of cohort) and data from 344 graduates of UK medical schools were analysed. Respondents were generally prepared for practice, but many reported few 'hands-on' experiences of providing immediate care during final year placements (a median of 1-2 experiences).Those who had 1-2 experiences reported no greater preparedness for acute management than those reporting no experience. Several exposures are necessary for a significant increase in perceived preparedness. Real-life experience was a better predictor of preparedness than simulated practice.

Conclusions: Gaps still remain in medical students' acute care experience, with a direct relationship to their perceived preparedness. The format and facilitation of placements may need to be addressed in order to enhance the quality of experience during final year.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus