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Urinary and faecal N-methylhistamine concentrations do not serve as markers for mast cell activation or clinical disease activity in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

Anfinsen KP, Berghoff N, Priestnall SL, Suchodolski JS, Steiner JM, Allenspach K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2014)

Bottom Line: Post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in toluidine blue positive mast cells between two treatment groups (exclusion diet with/without metronidazole versus immunosuppression (IS)), with higher numbers among dogs not requiring IS.The number of duodenal mast cells was higher in dogs that did not need IS, i.e. in dogs responding to an exclusion diet (with/without metronidazole), than in dogs requiring IS.Further studies comparing the role of mast cells in dogs with different forms of CE are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, AL9 7TA, England. kristin.anfinsen@nmbu.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study sought to correlate faecal and urinary N-methylhistamine (NMH) concentrations with resting versus degranulated duodenal mast cell numbers in dogs with chronic enteropathies (CE), and investigate correlations between intestinal mast cell activation and clinical severity of disease as assessed by canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI), and between urinary and faecal NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, and histopathological scores. Twenty-eight dogs with CE were included. Duodenal biopsies were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and by immunohistochemical labelling for tryptase. Duodenal biopsies were assigned a histopathological severity score, and duodenal mast cell numbers were counted in five high-power fields after metachromatic and immunohistochemical staining. Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results: There was no correlation between the CCECAI and faecal or urinary NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, or histopathological score - or between faecal or urinary NMH concentration and mast cell numbers. Post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in toluidine blue positive mast cells between two treatment groups (exclusion diet with/without metronidazole versus immunosuppression (IS)), with higher numbers among dogs not requiring IS.

Conclusion: Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations and duodenal mast cell numbers were not useful indicators of severity of disease as assessed by the CCECAI or histological evaluation. The number of duodenal mast cells was higher in dogs that did not need IS, i.e. in dogs responding to an exclusion diet (with/without metronidazole), than in dogs requiring IS. Further studies comparing the role of mast cells in dogs with different forms of CE are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Median numbers of MCTin 5 high power fields (×40) for 24 dogs with chronic enteropathy, grouped based on treatment. IS = treated by immunosuppression; Metr = treated with metronidazole. Lines represent median and interquartile range.
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Fig4: Median numbers of MCTin 5 high power fields (×40) for 24 dogs with chronic enteropathy, grouped based on treatment. IS = treated by immunosuppression; Metr = treated with metronidazole. Lines represent median and interquartile range.

Mentions: Treatment initiated or advised by clinicians at the QMHA was recorded for each dog, and consisted of an exclusion diet with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) metronidazole, or IS (n = 10; these dogs had failed treatment trials with diet and metronidazole, either prior to or after referral to the QMHA). Biopsies from 4 of the dogs (3 treated with IS, one with diet and metronidazole) were missing from the archive. Due to the low number of dogs, assessment of differences between treatment groups was not attempted in this study. However, the data gave an impression of higher numbers of mast cells detected in duodenal biopsies from dogs in which IS therapy was not necessary; i.e. dogs responding to an exclusion diet with or without metronidazole. Post hoc analysis revealed that dogs eventually requiring immunosuppressive therapy had less MCTB (P = 0.041) in their pre-treatment biopsies than those responding to an exclusion diet, with or without metronidazole, (Figure 3). There was no statistically significant difference between these groups for numbers of MCT (P = 0.105; Figure 4), and there was no difference between numbers of MCTB in dogs treated with an exclusion diet and metronidazole versus an exclusion diet alone (P = 0.41; Figure 5). Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations did not differ between treatment groups (P = 0.52 and P = 0.95, respectively).Figure 3


Urinary and faecal N-methylhistamine concentrations do not serve as markers for mast cell activation or clinical disease activity in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

Anfinsen KP, Berghoff N, Priestnall SL, Suchodolski JS, Steiner JM, Allenspach K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2014)

Median numbers of MCTin 5 high power fields (×40) for 24 dogs with chronic enteropathy, grouped based on treatment. IS = treated by immunosuppression; Metr = treated with metronidazole. Lines represent median and interquartile range.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4288550&req=5

Fig4: Median numbers of MCTin 5 high power fields (×40) for 24 dogs with chronic enteropathy, grouped based on treatment. IS = treated by immunosuppression; Metr = treated with metronidazole. Lines represent median and interquartile range.
Mentions: Treatment initiated or advised by clinicians at the QMHA was recorded for each dog, and consisted of an exclusion diet with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) metronidazole, or IS (n = 10; these dogs had failed treatment trials with diet and metronidazole, either prior to or after referral to the QMHA). Biopsies from 4 of the dogs (3 treated with IS, one with diet and metronidazole) were missing from the archive. Due to the low number of dogs, assessment of differences between treatment groups was not attempted in this study. However, the data gave an impression of higher numbers of mast cells detected in duodenal biopsies from dogs in which IS therapy was not necessary; i.e. dogs responding to an exclusion diet with or without metronidazole. Post hoc analysis revealed that dogs eventually requiring immunosuppressive therapy had less MCTB (P = 0.041) in their pre-treatment biopsies than those responding to an exclusion diet, with or without metronidazole, (Figure 3). There was no statistically significant difference between these groups for numbers of MCT (P = 0.105; Figure 4), and there was no difference between numbers of MCTB in dogs treated with an exclusion diet and metronidazole versus an exclusion diet alone (P = 0.41; Figure 5). Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations did not differ between treatment groups (P = 0.52 and P = 0.95, respectively).Figure 3

Bottom Line: Post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in toluidine blue positive mast cells between two treatment groups (exclusion diet with/without metronidazole versus immunosuppression (IS)), with higher numbers among dogs not requiring IS.The number of duodenal mast cells was higher in dogs that did not need IS, i.e. in dogs responding to an exclusion diet (with/without metronidazole), than in dogs requiring IS.Further studies comparing the role of mast cells in dogs with different forms of CE are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, AL9 7TA, England. kristin.anfinsen@nmbu.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study sought to correlate faecal and urinary N-methylhistamine (NMH) concentrations with resting versus degranulated duodenal mast cell numbers in dogs with chronic enteropathies (CE), and investigate correlations between intestinal mast cell activation and clinical severity of disease as assessed by canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI), and between urinary and faecal NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, and histopathological scores. Twenty-eight dogs with CE were included. Duodenal biopsies were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and by immunohistochemical labelling for tryptase. Duodenal biopsies were assigned a histopathological severity score, and duodenal mast cell numbers were counted in five high-power fields after metachromatic and immunohistochemical staining. Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results: There was no correlation between the CCECAI and faecal or urinary NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, or histopathological score - or between faecal or urinary NMH concentration and mast cell numbers. Post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in toluidine blue positive mast cells between two treatment groups (exclusion diet with/without metronidazole versus immunosuppression (IS)), with higher numbers among dogs not requiring IS.

Conclusion: Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations and duodenal mast cell numbers were not useful indicators of severity of disease as assessed by the CCECAI or histological evaluation. The number of duodenal mast cells was higher in dogs that did not need IS, i.e. in dogs responding to an exclusion diet (with/without metronidazole), than in dogs requiring IS. Further studies comparing the role of mast cells in dogs with different forms of CE are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus