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Plant defence responses in oilseed rape MINELESS plants after attack by the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae.

Ahuja I, van Dam NM, Winge P, Trælnes M, Heydarova A, Rohloff J, Langaas M, Bones AM - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: No-choice feeding experiments showed that M. brassicae larvae gained less weight and showed stunted growth when feeding on MINELESS plants compared to feeding on wild-type plants.M. brassicae feeding didn't affect myrosinase activity in MINELESS plants, but did reduce it in wild-type seedlings.Taken together, the outcomes are very interesting in terms of analysing the role of myrosin cells and the glucosinolate-myrosinase defence system in response to a generalist cabbage moth, suggesting that similar studies with other generalist or specialist insect herbivores, including above- and below-ground herbivores, would be useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.

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Growth of M. brassicae on wild-type and MINELESS plants in no-choice feeding experiments. (A, B) The weights of larvae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings differed significantly for day 3, 8, 10, and 12 (A); and day 7 and 12 (B). n, number of larvae. Values represent mean ± SE; ***, P < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test).
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Figure 1: Growth of M. brassicae on wild-type and MINELESS plants in no-choice feeding experiments. (A, B) The weights of larvae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings differed significantly for day 3, 8, 10, and 12 (A); and day 7 and 12 (B). n, number of larvae. Values represent mean ± SE; ***, P < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test).

Mentions: The feeding experiments with M. brassicae showed that larvae gained significantly less weight on MINELESS seedlings compared to the wild-type seedlings at all time points: (Experiment I) day 3, 8, 10, and 12, P < 0.001; (Experiment II) day 7 and 12, P < 0.001 (Fig. 1). The average weights of larvae feeding on MINELESS plants were 1.5, 2.2, 4.1, and 3.6 times lower than the average weights of larvae that had been feeding on the wild-type for day 3, 8, 10, and 12, respectively (Experiment I) (Fig. 1A). Similarly, in feeding Experiment II, the average larvae weights were observed to be 2.2 and 2.6 times lower when feeding MINELESS seedlings compared to the wild-type for day 7 and 12, respectively (Fig. 1B). Both experiments showed similar reduction (2.2 times) in larvae weights for day 7 (Experiment II) and day 8 (Experiment I). How larvae feed on wild-type and MINELESS plants, and how they appeared after 12 days of feeding, can be seen in Supplementary Videos V1 and V2.


Plant defence responses in oilseed rape MINELESS plants after attack by the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae.

Ahuja I, van Dam NM, Winge P, Trælnes M, Heydarova A, Rohloff J, Langaas M, Bones AM - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Growth of M. brassicae on wild-type and MINELESS plants in no-choice feeding experiments. (A, B) The weights of larvae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings differed significantly for day 3, 8, 10, and 12 (A); and day 7 and 12 (B). n, number of larvae. Values represent mean ± SE; ***, P < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4286410&req=5

Figure 1: Growth of M. brassicae on wild-type and MINELESS plants in no-choice feeding experiments. (A, B) The weights of larvae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings differed significantly for day 3, 8, 10, and 12 (A); and day 7 and 12 (B). n, number of larvae. Values represent mean ± SE; ***, P < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test).
Mentions: The feeding experiments with M. brassicae showed that larvae gained significantly less weight on MINELESS seedlings compared to the wild-type seedlings at all time points: (Experiment I) day 3, 8, 10, and 12, P < 0.001; (Experiment II) day 7 and 12, P < 0.001 (Fig. 1). The average weights of larvae feeding on MINELESS plants were 1.5, 2.2, 4.1, and 3.6 times lower than the average weights of larvae that had been feeding on the wild-type for day 3, 8, 10, and 12, respectively (Experiment I) (Fig. 1A). Similarly, in feeding Experiment II, the average larvae weights were observed to be 2.2 and 2.6 times lower when feeding MINELESS seedlings compared to the wild-type for day 7 and 12, respectively (Fig. 1B). Both experiments showed similar reduction (2.2 times) in larvae weights for day 7 (Experiment II) and day 8 (Experiment I). How larvae feed on wild-type and MINELESS plants, and how they appeared after 12 days of feeding, can be seen in Supplementary Videos V1 and V2.

Bottom Line: No-choice feeding experiments showed that M. brassicae larvae gained less weight and showed stunted growth when feeding on MINELESS plants compared to feeding on wild-type plants.M. brassicae feeding didn't affect myrosinase activity in MINELESS plants, but did reduce it in wild-type seedlings.Taken together, the outcomes are very interesting in terms of analysing the role of myrosin cells and the glucosinolate-myrosinase defence system in response to a generalist cabbage moth, suggesting that similar studies with other generalist or specialist insect herbivores, including above- and below-ground herbivores, would be useful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus