Limits...
Accumulation of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize (Zea mays) leaves is induced by insect feeding and abiotic stress.

Yan J, Lipka AE, Schmelz EA, Buckler ES, Jander G - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: In contrast, ethylene signalling reduced 5-hydroxynorvaline abundance.Among 27 tested maize inbred lines there was a greater than 10-fold range in the accumulation of foliar 5-hydroxynorvaline.Genetic mapping populations derived from a subset of these inbred lines were used to map quantitative trait loci for 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation to maize chromosomes 5 and 7.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY, USA.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Induction and localization of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize. Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize seedlings after treatment with (A) 0.45mM methyl jasmonate, (B) 0.1mM abscisic acid, (C) 0.45mM salicylic acid or (D) 0.45mM 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene precursor). N = 3 for A–D; *P < 0.05, t test relative to day 0 sample. 5-Hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings treated with (E) R. maidis (N = 3), (F) S. exigua (N = 3) and (G) mock-infected or infected with C. heterostrophus (southern leaf blight; N = 4). *P < 0.05 relative to controls, t test. (H) Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in dry seeds and different parts of field-grown maize inbred line B73 (N =4).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4286406&req=5

Figure 2: Induction and localization of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize. Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize seedlings after treatment with (A) 0.45mM methyl jasmonate, (B) 0.1mM abscisic acid, (C) 0.45mM salicylic acid or (D) 0.45mM 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene precursor). N = 3 for A–D; *P < 0.05, t test relative to day 0 sample. 5-Hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings treated with (E) R. maidis (N = 3), (F) S. exigua (N = 3) and (G) mock-infected or infected with C. heterostrophus (southern leaf blight; N = 4). *P < 0.05 relative to controls, t test. (H) Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in dry seeds and different parts of field-grown maize inbred line B73 (N =4).

Mentions: In addition to methyl jasmonate (Fig. 2A), abscisic acid (Fig. 2B) and salicylic acid (Fig. 2C) treatment transiently increased 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings. In contrast, treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene metabolic precursor) reduced the 5-hydroxynorvaline abundance (Fig. 2D). Consistent with the observed induction by methyl jasmonate (Fig. 2A), 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation was increased by aphid (R. maidis, Fig. 2E) and caterpillar (S. exigua, Fig. 2F) feeding. However, infection with a fungal pathogen, C. heterstrophus, did not increase 5-hydroxynorvaline concentrations to a higher level than mock-infected controls (Fig. 2G), despite the fact that C. heterstrophus-infected leaves showed visible tissue necrosis and mock-infected leaves did not.


Accumulation of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize (Zea mays) leaves is induced by insect feeding and abiotic stress.

Yan J, Lipka AE, Schmelz EA, Buckler ES, Jander G - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Induction and localization of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize. Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize seedlings after treatment with (A) 0.45mM methyl jasmonate, (B) 0.1mM abscisic acid, (C) 0.45mM salicylic acid or (D) 0.45mM 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene precursor). N = 3 for A–D; *P < 0.05, t test relative to day 0 sample. 5-Hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings treated with (E) R. maidis (N = 3), (F) S. exigua (N = 3) and (G) mock-infected or infected with C. heterostrophus (southern leaf blight; N = 4). *P < 0.05 relative to controls, t test. (H) Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in dry seeds and different parts of field-grown maize inbred line B73 (N =4).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4286406&req=5

Figure 2: Induction and localization of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize. Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in maize seedlings after treatment with (A) 0.45mM methyl jasmonate, (B) 0.1mM abscisic acid, (C) 0.45mM salicylic acid or (D) 0.45mM 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene precursor). N = 3 for A–D; *P < 0.05, t test relative to day 0 sample. 5-Hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings treated with (E) R. maidis (N = 3), (F) S. exigua (N = 3) and (G) mock-infected or infected with C. heterostrophus (southern leaf blight; N = 4). *P < 0.05 relative to controls, t test. (H) Abundance of 5-hydroxynorvaline in dry seeds and different parts of field-grown maize inbred line B73 (N =4).
Mentions: In addition to methyl jasmonate (Fig. 2A), abscisic acid (Fig. 2B) and salicylic acid (Fig. 2C) treatment transiently increased 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation in maize seedlings. In contrast, treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, an ethylene metabolic precursor) reduced the 5-hydroxynorvaline abundance (Fig. 2D). Consistent with the observed induction by methyl jasmonate (Fig. 2A), 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation was increased by aphid (R. maidis, Fig. 2E) and caterpillar (S. exigua, Fig. 2F) feeding. However, infection with a fungal pathogen, C. heterstrophus, did not increase 5-hydroxynorvaline concentrations to a higher level than mock-infected controls (Fig. 2G), despite the fact that C. heterstrophus-infected leaves showed visible tissue necrosis and mock-infected leaves did not.

Bottom Line: In contrast, ethylene signalling reduced 5-hydroxynorvaline abundance.Among 27 tested maize inbred lines there was a greater than 10-fold range in the accumulation of foliar 5-hydroxynorvaline.Genetic mapping populations derived from a subset of these inbred lines were used to map quantitative trait loci for 5-hydroxynorvaline accumulation to maize chromosomes 5 and 7.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus