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Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress.

Wall M, Putchim L, Schmidt GM, Jantzen C, Khokiattiwong S, Richter C - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals.LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate.Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, Am Alten Hafen 26, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany GEOMAR, Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Marine Geosystems, Wischhofstraße 1-3, 24148 Kiel, Germany mwall@geomar.de.

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Coral group status during the bleaching event in May 2010, for Pocilloporidae (red), Acropora spp. (cyan), Porites spp. massive (green), Porites spp. branching (purple), other (blue), Diploastrea heliopora (yellow). Coral group status recorded as (a) healthy, (b) pale, (c) bleached and (d) recently dead and displayed as a fraction of total coral group cover for the sheltered versus exposed island sides during the bleaching event in May 2010.
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RSPB20140650F3: Coral group status during the bleaching event in May 2010, for Pocilloporidae (red), Acropora spp. (cyan), Porites spp. massive (green), Porites spp. branching (purple), other (blue), Diploastrea heliopora (yellow). Coral group status recorded as (a) healthy, (b) pale, (c) bleached and (d) recently dead and displayed as a fraction of total coral group cover for the sheltered versus exposed island sides during the bleaching event in May 2010.

Mentions: Owing to its intermittent nature, LAIW cooling is not expected to completely ify heat stress. Thus, bleached corals were observed at all sites during this severe heat stress and only a small percentage of corals remained healthy two months after the temperature had started to exceed the bleaching threshold. However, a greater percentage of healthy and pale corals were observed at the LAIW-exposed sites while the percentage of bleached and recently dead corals was higher at the LAIW-sheltered sites (figure 3). This was particularly apparent when comparing exposed with sheltered sites of the same island (e.g. BR differences sheltered versus exposed: Racha = 52.6 versus 39.0, Miang = 71.4 versus 41.8 and Surin = 61.2 versus 45.2; table 2).Figure 3.


Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress.

Wall M, Putchim L, Schmidt GM, Jantzen C, Khokiattiwong S, Richter C - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Coral group status during the bleaching event in May 2010, for Pocilloporidae (red), Acropora spp. (cyan), Porites spp. massive (green), Porites spp. branching (purple), other (blue), Diploastrea heliopora (yellow). Coral group status recorded as (a) healthy, (b) pale, (c) bleached and (d) recently dead and displayed as a fraction of total coral group cover for the sheltered versus exposed island sides during the bleaching event in May 2010.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4286055&req=5

RSPB20140650F3: Coral group status during the bleaching event in May 2010, for Pocilloporidae (red), Acropora spp. (cyan), Porites spp. massive (green), Porites spp. branching (purple), other (blue), Diploastrea heliopora (yellow). Coral group status recorded as (a) healthy, (b) pale, (c) bleached and (d) recently dead and displayed as a fraction of total coral group cover for the sheltered versus exposed island sides during the bleaching event in May 2010.
Mentions: Owing to its intermittent nature, LAIW cooling is not expected to completely ify heat stress. Thus, bleached corals were observed at all sites during this severe heat stress and only a small percentage of corals remained healthy two months after the temperature had started to exceed the bleaching threshold. However, a greater percentage of healthy and pale corals were observed at the LAIW-exposed sites while the percentage of bleached and recently dead corals was higher at the LAIW-sheltered sites (figure 3). This was particularly apparent when comparing exposed with sheltered sites of the same island (e.g. BR differences sheltered versus exposed: Racha = 52.6 versus 39.0, Miang = 71.4 versus 41.8 and Surin = 61.2 versus 45.2; table 2).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals.LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate.Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, Am Alten Hafen 26, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany GEOMAR, Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Marine Geosystems, Wischhofstraße 1-3, 24148 Kiel, Germany mwall@geomar.de.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus