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Gamification as a tool for enhancing graduate medical education.

Nevin CR, Westfall AO, Rodriguez JM, Dempsey DM, Cherrington A, Roy B, Patel M, Willig JH - Postgrad Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: We completed focus groups to assess participant acceptance and analysed software use, retention of knowledge and factors associated with loss of participants (attrition).Our software-enabled, gamification-based educational intervention was well accepted among our millennial learners.Coupling software with gamification and analysis of trainee use and engagement data can be used to develop strategies to augment learning in time-constrained educational settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample of Kaizen-Internal Medicine (Kaizen-IM) graphical user interface. (A) Kaizen-IM question and response. (B) Kaizen-IM leaderboard.
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POSTGRADMEDJ2013132486F1: Sample of Kaizen-Internal Medicine (Kaizen-IM) graphical user interface. (A) Kaizen-IM question and response. (B) Kaizen-IM leaderboard.

Mentions: Our Kaizen-IM season lasted throughout the 2012–2013 academic year and was divided into three rounds (rounds 1–3). Each round included general IM questions and questions from three medical subspecialties. Questions were written by faculty and emphasised clarity, brevity and were followed by a concise explanation of the correct response (figure 1). Questions were published at 00:01 daily, there was no time limit for response and unanswered questions remained to be addressed at the trainee's convenience. Participants could review prior questions/answers and earned badges at any time. Residents competed with one another as individuals and were also divided into six predetermined teams based on faculty advisor for team competition.


Gamification as a tool for enhancing graduate medical education.

Nevin CR, Westfall AO, Rodriguez JM, Dempsey DM, Cherrington A, Roy B, Patel M, Willig JH - Postgrad Med J (2014)

Sample of Kaizen-Internal Medicine (Kaizen-IM) graphical user interface. (A) Kaizen-IM question and response. (B) Kaizen-IM leaderboard.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285889&req=5

POSTGRADMEDJ2013132486F1: Sample of Kaizen-Internal Medicine (Kaizen-IM) graphical user interface. (A) Kaizen-IM question and response. (B) Kaizen-IM leaderboard.
Mentions: Our Kaizen-IM season lasted throughout the 2012–2013 academic year and was divided into three rounds (rounds 1–3). Each round included general IM questions and questions from three medical subspecialties. Questions were written by faculty and emphasised clarity, brevity and were followed by a concise explanation of the correct response (figure 1). Questions were published at 00:01 daily, there was no time limit for response and unanswered questions remained to be addressed at the trainee's convenience. Participants could review prior questions/answers and earned badges at any time. Residents competed with one another as individuals and were also divided into six predetermined teams based on faculty advisor for team competition.

Bottom Line: We completed focus groups to assess participant acceptance and analysed software use, retention of knowledge and factors associated with loss of participants (attrition).Our software-enabled, gamification-based educational intervention was well accepted among our millennial learners.Coupling software with gamification and analysis of trainee use and engagement data can be used to develop strategies to augment learning in time-constrained educational settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus