Limits...
Perspectives on Li and transition metal fluoride phosphates as cathode materials for a new generation of Li-ion batteries.

Antipov EV, Khasanova NR, Fedotov SS - IUCrJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Further advances in cathode materials are considered to lie in combining different anions [such as (XO4) (n-) and F(-)] in the anion sublattice, which is expected to enhance the specific energy and power of these materials.This review focuses on recent advances related to the new class of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries containing phosphate and fluoride anions.Special attention is given to their crystal structures and the relationships between structure and properties, which are important for their possible practical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991, Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT
To satisfy the needs of rapidly growing applications, Li-ion batteries require further significant improvements of their key properties: specific energy and power, cyclability, safety and costs. The first generation of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries based on mixed oxides with either spinel or rock-salt derivatives has already been widely commercialized, but the potential to improve the performance of these materials further is almost exhausted. Li and transition metal inorganic compounds containing different polyanions are now considered as the most promising cathode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries. Further advances in cathode materials are considered to lie in combining different anions [such as (XO4) (n-) and F(-)] in the anion sublattice, which is expected to enhance the specific energy and power of these materials. This review focuses on recent advances related to the new class of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries containing phosphate and fluoride anions. Special attention is given to their crystal structures and the relationships between structure and properties, which are important for their possible practical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representations of the Na2MPO4F fluoride phosphate. (a) The crystal structure. (b) Projections of BVS maps of alkali-ion migration pathways in the (011) and (101) layers. The MO4F2 octahedra are depicted in blue, phosphate tetrahedra in green, F in grey, and alkali ions in purple and orange.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285883&req=5

fig3: Representations of the Na2MPO4F fluoride phosphate. (a) The crystal structure. (b) Projections of BVS maps of alkali-ion migration pathways in the (011) and (101) layers. The MO4F2 octahedra are depicted in blue, phosphate tetrahedra in green, F in grey, and alkali ions in purple and orange.

Mentions: They consist of a layered framework described in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn. Bi-octahedral M2O7F2 units comprising face-sharing MO4F2 octahedra are connected via bridging F atoms to form chains, and these are interconnected by PO4 tetrahedra to yield [MPO4F] infinite slabs. The Na atoms occupy two distinct crystallographic sites located in the interlayer space and possess facile two-dimensional migration pathways (Fig. 3 ▶a). Although this type of fluoride phosphate has been stabilized for different transition metals (M = Fe, Co, Ni), detailed investigation of their structures and electrochemical properties was only carried out for the iron-based fluoride phosphate Na2FePO4F [a = 5.2200 (2) Å, b = 13.8540 (6) Å, c = 11.7792 (5) Å and V = 851.85 Å3; Ellis et al., 2007 ▶].


Perspectives on Li and transition metal fluoride phosphates as cathode materials for a new generation of Li-ion batteries.

Antipov EV, Khasanova NR, Fedotov SS - IUCrJ (2015)

Representations of the Na2MPO4F fluoride phosphate. (a) The crystal structure. (b) Projections of BVS maps of alkali-ion migration pathways in the (011) and (101) layers. The MO4F2 octahedra are depicted in blue, phosphate tetrahedra in green, F in grey, and alkali ions in purple and orange.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285883&req=5

fig3: Representations of the Na2MPO4F fluoride phosphate. (a) The crystal structure. (b) Projections of BVS maps of alkali-ion migration pathways in the (011) and (101) layers. The MO4F2 octahedra are depicted in blue, phosphate tetrahedra in green, F in grey, and alkali ions in purple and orange.
Mentions: They consist of a layered framework described in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn. Bi-octahedral M2O7F2 units comprising face-sharing MO4F2 octahedra are connected via bridging F atoms to form chains, and these are interconnected by PO4 tetrahedra to yield [MPO4F] infinite slabs. The Na atoms occupy two distinct crystallographic sites located in the interlayer space and possess facile two-dimensional migration pathways (Fig. 3 ▶a). Although this type of fluoride phosphate has been stabilized for different transition metals (M = Fe, Co, Ni), detailed investigation of their structures and electrochemical properties was only carried out for the iron-based fluoride phosphate Na2FePO4F [a = 5.2200 (2) Å, b = 13.8540 (6) Å, c = 11.7792 (5) Å and V = 851.85 Å3; Ellis et al., 2007 ▶].

Bottom Line: Further advances in cathode materials are considered to lie in combining different anions [such as (XO4) (n-) and F(-)] in the anion sublattice, which is expected to enhance the specific energy and power of these materials.This review focuses on recent advances related to the new class of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries containing phosphate and fluoride anions.Special attention is given to their crystal structures and the relationships between structure and properties, which are important for their possible practical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991, Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT
To satisfy the needs of rapidly growing applications, Li-ion batteries require further significant improvements of their key properties: specific energy and power, cyclability, safety and costs. The first generation of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries based on mixed oxides with either spinel or rock-salt derivatives has already been widely commercialized, but the potential to improve the performance of these materials further is almost exhausted. Li and transition metal inorganic compounds containing different polyanions are now considered as the most promising cathode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries. Further advances in cathode materials are considered to lie in combining different anions [such as (XO4) (n-) and F(-)] in the anion sublattice, which is expected to enhance the specific energy and power of these materials. This review focuses on recent advances related to the new class of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries containing phosphate and fluoride anions. Special attention is given to their crystal structures and the relationships between structure and properties, which are important for their possible practical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus