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Ecological and evolutionary implications of spatial heterogeneity during the off-season for a wild plant pathogen.

Tack AJ, Laine AL - New Phytol. (2013)

Bottom Line: We combined large-scale surveys and detailed experiments to investigate the overwintering success of the specialist plant pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis on its patchily distributed host plant Plantago lanceolata in the Åland Islands.Twelve years of epidemiological data establish the off-season as a crucial stage in pathogen metapopulation dynamics, with c. 40% of the populations going extinct during the off-season.We conclude that environmentally mediated changes in the distribution and evolution of parasites during the off-season are crucial for our understanding of host-parasite dynamics, with applied implications for combating parasites and diseases in agriculture, wildlife and human disease systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65 (Viikinkaari 1), FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

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Spatial variation in the production of resting structures (i.e. fraction of infected leaves with resting structures) by the powdery mildew Podosphaera plantaginis for each of three years. The graphs on the right show the distribution of the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures across populations. For each year, the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures is highly variable among populations, but particularly so in 2010 and 2012.
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fig04: Spatial variation in the production of resting structures (i.e. fraction of infected leaves with resting structures) by the powdery mildew Podosphaera plantaginis for each of three years. The graphs on the right show the distribution of the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures across populations. For each year, the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures is highly variable among populations, but particularly so in 2010 and 2012.

Mentions: The production of resting structures was highly variable among populations (Fig. 4) and affected by several environmental factors in each of the years 2010–2012, though the impact of individual factors varied strongly among years (Table S3). In 2010, the formation of resting structures increased with plant dryness and decreased with rainfall in August (Table S3). In 2011, August rainfall likewise decreased the formation of resting structures, whereas July rainfall had the opposite effect, indicating the complex impact of rainfall across the growing season. Population age negatively affected the formation of resting structures in 2011, whereas it positively affected resting structures in 2012. Habitat openness had a strong positive impact on the formation of resting structures in both 2011 and 2012, while host spatial connectivity had a positive impact on the formation of resting structures in 2011 only. Production of resting structures was spatially correlated in each of the three years, with the mode for the spatial range varying from 2.0 to 4.6 km in 2010 and 2012, respectively (Fig. S4). Notably, while the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures covered the full range from zero to one in 2010 and 2012, there were no populations with no or few resting structures in 2011 (Fig. 4). The production of resting structures across populations was highly uncorrelated among years (all pairwise Pearson correlations P > 0.3).


Ecological and evolutionary implications of spatial heterogeneity during the off-season for a wild plant pathogen.

Tack AJ, Laine AL - New Phytol. (2013)

Spatial variation in the production of resting structures (i.e. fraction of infected leaves with resting structures) by the powdery mildew Podosphaera plantaginis for each of three years. The graphs on the right show the distribution of the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures across populations. For each year, the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures is highly variable among populations, but particularly so in 2010 and 2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285854&req=5

fig04: Spatial variation in the production of resting structures (i.e. fraction of infected leaves with resting structures) by the powdery mildew Podosphaera plantaginis for each of three years. The graphs on the right show the distribution of the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures across populations. For each year, the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures is highly variable among populations, but particularly so in 2010 and 2012.
Mentions: The production of resting structures was highly variable among populations (Fig. 4) and affected by several environmental factors in each of the years 2010–2012, though the impact of individual factors varied strongly among years (Table S3). In 2010, the formation of resting structures increased with plant dryness and decreased with rainfall in August (Table S3). In 2011, August rainfall likewise decreased the formation of resting structures, whereas July rainfall had the opposite effect, indicating the complex impact of rainfall across the growing season. Population age negatively affected the formation of resting structures in 2011, whereas it positively affected resting structures in 2012. Habitat openness had a strong positive impact on the formation of resting structures in both 2011 and 2012, while host spatial connectivity had a positive impact on the formation of resting structures in 2011 only. Production of resting structures was spatially correlated in each of the three years, with the mode for the spatial range varying from 2.0 to 4.6 km in 2010 and 2012, respectively (Fig. S4). Notably, while the fraction of infected leaves with resting structures covered the full range from zero to one in 2010 and 2012, there were no populations with no or few resting structures in 2011 (Fig. 4). The production of resting structures across populations was highly uncorrelated among years (all pairwise Pearson correlations P > 0.3).

Bottom Line: We combined large-scale surveys and detailed experiments to investigate the overwintering success of the specialist plant pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis on its patchily distributed host plant Plantago lanceolata in the Åland Islands.Twelve years of epidemiological data establish the off-season as a crucial stage in pathogen metapopulation dynamics, with c. 40% of the populations going extinct during the off-season.We conclude that environmentally mediated changes in the distribution and evolution of parasites during the off-season are crucial for our understanding of host-parasite dynamics, with applied implications for combating parasites and diseases in agriculture, wildlife and human disease systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65 (Viikinkaari 1), FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus