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Unexplained syncope: implications of age and gender on patient characteristics and evaluation, the diagnostic yield of an implantable loop recorder, and the subsequent treatment.

Edvardsson N, Garutti C, Rieger G, Linker NJ, PICTURE Study Investigato - Clin Cardiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Muscle spasms or grand mal seizures were more common in men and at <65 years old.There were no age- or gender-related differences in the diagnostic yield of the ILR, whereas patients ≥65 years old more often received specific treatment based on ILR data.Gender and/or age had relevance for the clinical evaluation, rate of recurrence, and subsequent specific treatment but not for the diagnostic yield of the ILR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

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Distribution of age at first syncope. Note the difference between the sexes in the age span of 40 to 55 years.
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fig01: Distribution of age at first syncope. Note the difference between the sexes in the age span of 40 to 55 years.

Mentions: Five hundred seventy patients were enrolled, 306 (54%) were women and 264 (46%) were men, with a mean age of 62 ± 18 and 60 ± 17 years, respectively. Women more often had syncope associated with severe trauma than men (41% vs 30%, P = 0.007) without any relation to age. Hospitalization because of syncope was of similar frequency in men and women (71% vs 69%, not significant) but was more common in patients ≥65 years than in younger patients (P = 0.03). The actual age at first syncope was 41 ± 17 vs 69 ± 13 years (P < 0.0001) in the <65 and ≥65 year groups, respectively. The average follow-up time was 10 ± 6 months. There were 3 age peaks in men, at about 20, 60, and 80 years, the latter being the highest. The curve for women was similar, except that the latter 2 peaks seem to have merged into 1 somewhat delayed peak at 60 to 80 years (Figure 1).


Unexplained syncope: implications of age and gender on patient characteristics and evaluation, the diagnostic yield of an implantable loop recorder, and the subsequent treatment.

Edvardsson N, Garutti C, Rieger G, Linker NJ, PICTURE Study Investigato - Clin Cardiol (2014)

Distribution of age at first syncope. Note the difference between the sexes in the age span of 40 to 55 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285819&req=5

fig01: Distribution of age at first syncope. Note the difference between the sexes in the age span of 40 to 55 years.
Mentions: Five hundred seventy patients were enrolled, 306 (54%) were women and 264 (46%) were men, with a mean age of 62 ± 18 and 60 ± 17 years, respectively. Women more often had syncope associated with severe trauma than men (41% vs 30%, P = 0.007) without any relation to age. Hospitalization because of syncope was of similar frequency in men and women (71% vs 69%, not significant) but was more common in patients ≥65 years than in younger patients (P = 0.03). The actual age at first syncope was 41 ± 17 vs 69 ± 13 years (P < 0.0001) in the <65 and ≥65 year groups, respectively. The average follow-up time was 10 ± 6 months. There were 3 age peaks in men, at about 20, 60, and 80 years, the latter being the highest. The curve for women was similar, except that the latter 2 peaks seem to have merged into 1 somewhat delayed peak at 60 to 80 years (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Muscle spasms or grand mal seizures were more common in men and at <65 years old.There were no age- or gender-related differences in the diagnostic yield of the ILR, whereas patients ≥65 years old more often received specific treatment based on ILR data.Gender and/or age had relevance for the clinical evaluation, rate of recurrence, and subsequent specific treatment but not for the diagnostic yield of the ILR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus