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The evolution of nanopore sequencing.

Wang Y, Yang Q, Wang Z - Front Genet (2015)

Bottom Line: Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors.A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards.In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The "$1000 Genome" project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the "$1000 Genome" while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic illustration of the fabrication of an FET nanopore, in which a dsDNA is translocating through the pore (not to scale) (Traversi et al., 2013). Reproduced by copyright permission of Nature Publishing Group.
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Figure 13: Schematic illustration of the fabrication of an FET nanopore, in which a dsDNA is translocating through the pore (not to scale) (Traversi et al., 2013). Reproduced by copyright permission of Nature Publishing Group.

Mentions: In 2013, Drndić's group described fabrication of FET monolayer graphene nanopores with diameters between 2 and 10 nm using EBL (Puster et al., 2013). Radenovic's group reported fabrication of graphene-based FET sensors and signal tests on DNA translocation (Traversi et al., 2013) (Figure 13). Their results also support local potential change-related sensing mechanism. Leburton proposed a four-layer FET nanopore sequencing design called graphene quantum point contact device (Girdhar et al., 2013), where the top graphene layer controlls DNA translocation speed, the second confines lateral positioning of the bases, the third detectes lateral conductance, and the bottom alteres the carrier concentration. These compelling works suggest that further innovation toward sequencing by FET sensors will be soon emerging.


The evolution of nanopore sequencing.

Wang Y, Yang Q, Wang Z - Front Genet (2015)

Schematic illustration of the fabrication of an FET nanopore, in which a dsDNA is translocating through the pore (not to scale) (Traversi et al., 2013). Reproduced by copyright permission of Nature Publishing Group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285804&req=5

Figure 13: Schematic illustration of the fabrication of an FET nanopore, in which a dsDNA is translocating through the pore (not to scale) (Traversi et al., 2013). Reproduced by copyright permission of Nature Publishing Group.
Mentions: In 2013, Drndić's group described fabrication of FET monolayer graphene nanopores with diameters between 2 and 10 nm using EBL (Puster et al., 2013). Radenovic's group reported fabrication of graphene-based FET sensors and signal tests on DNA translocation (Traversi et al., 2013) (Figure 13). Their results also support local potential change-related sensing mechanism. Leburton proposed a four-layer FET nanopore sequencing design called graphene quantum point contact device (Girdhar et al., 2013), where the top graphene layer controlls DNA translocation speed, the second confines lateral positioning of the bases, the third detectes lateral conductance, and the bottom alteres the carrier concentration. These compelling works suggest that further innovation toward sequencing by FET sensors will be soon emerging.

Bottom Line: Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors.A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards.In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The "$1000 Genome" project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the "$1000 Genome" while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

No MeSH data available.