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The evolution of nanopore sequencing.

Wang Y, Yang Q, Wang Z - Front Genet (2015)

Bottom Line: Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors.A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards.In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The "$1000 Genome" project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the "$1000 Genome" while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

No MeSH data available.


Nanopore capacitor. (A) A TEM top-view of the nanopore capacitor device. (B) Schematic illustration of the nanopore capacitor. (C) A TEM side-view of the nanopore capacitor (Gracheva et al., 2006). Reproduced by copyright permission of IOP Publishing Ltd.
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Figure 12: Nanopore capacitor. (A) A TEM top-view of the nanopore capacitor device. (B) Schematic illustration of the nanopore capacitor. (C) A TEM side-view of the nanopore capacitor (Gracheva et al., 2006). Reproduced by copyright permission of IOP Publishing Ltd.

Mentions: In 2005, Heng et al. proposed a design that used nanopore capacitor made in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) membrane to sense bases when an ssDNA strand is translocating through the pore (Heng et al., 2005). Their simulation results demonstrated that such a device holds to sequence DNA (Heng et al., 2005; Gracheva et al., 2006; Sigalov et al., 2008) (Figure 12). In 2010, Leroux presented a similar design that used a nanopore in a semiconductor-oxide-semiconductor membrane to distinguish individual bases (Leroux et al., 2010). Their theoretical analysis showed that this is possible. In 2012, Yan's group proposed a sequencing method by using single-electron transistor-based nanopore (Guo et al., 2012). Based on simulation results, they concluded that bases could be identified only in some regions. Although supporting evidence from experiments are currently unavailable, these transistor-based approaches can potentially be integrated with semiconductor technology for massive parallelization.


The evolution of nanopore sequencing.

Wang Y, Yang Q, Wang Z - Front Genet (2015)

Nanopore capacitor. (A) A TEM top-view of the nanopore capacitor device. (B) Schematic illustration of the nanopore capacitor. (C) A TEM side-view of the nanopore capacitor (Gracheva et al., 2006). Reproduced by copyright permission of IOP Publishing Ltd.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285804&req=5

Figure 12: Nanopore capacitor. (A) A TEM top-view of the nanopore capacitor device. (B) Schematic illustration of the nanopore capacitor. (C) A TEM side-view of the nanopore capacitor (Gracheva et al., 2006). Reproduced by copyright permission of IOP Publishing Ltd.
Mentions: In 2005, Heng et al. proposed a design that used nanopore capacitor made in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) membrane to sense bases when an ssDNA strand is translocating through the pore (Heng et al., 2005). Their simulation results demonstrated that such a device holds to sequence DNA (Heng et al., 2005; Gracheva et al., 2006; Sigalov et al., 2008) (Figure 12). In 2010, Leroux presented a similar design that used a nanopore in a semiconductor-oxide-semiconductor membrane to distinguish individual bases (Leroux et al., 2010). Their theoretical analysis showed that this is possible. In 2012, Yan's group proposed a sequencing method by using single-electron transistor-based nanopore (Guo et al., 2012). Based on simulation results, they concluded that bases could be identified only in some regions. Although supporting evidence from experiments are currently unavailable, these transistor-based approaches can potentially be integrated with semiconductor technology for massive parallelization.

Bottom Line: Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors.A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards.In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
The "$1000 Genome" project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the "$1000 Genome" while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

No MeSH data available.