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Hydrophobically modified polymers can minimize skin irritation potential caused by surfactant-based cleansers.

Draelos Z, Hornby S, Walters RM, Appa Y - J Cosmet Dermatol (2013)

Bottom Line: Clinicians as well as study subjects consistently rated the test cleanser as effective or slightly more effective at improving symptoms than the commercial cleanser, although no significant differences between groups were observed.In addition, subject self-assessments of skin condition and cleansing properties were slightly more improved with the test cleanser than with the commercial cleanser.Both the test foaming cleanser containing HMPs and the commercial nonfoaming cleanser were effective and well accepted by most women in the study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dermatology Consulting Services, High Point, NC, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant agreement with statements about cleansing efficacy and makeup removal at week 1 (a) and week 3 (b).
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fig03: Participant agreement with statements about cleansing efficacy and makeup removal at week 1 (a) and week 3 (b).

Mentions: As part of the study, women were asked to agree or disagree with specific statements about the efficacy of each facial cleanser at the 1- and 3-week time points. As shown in Figure 3, most women agreed with the statements after using the benchmark commercial nonfoaming cleanser or the test foaming facial cleanser for 1 week or 3 weeks. Of note, 80% or more of women agreed with each statement about the effectiveness of the test facial cleanser with HMPs at week 1 and more than 90% agreed at week 3. The majority of women who used the commercial nonfoaming facial cleanser also agreed with each statement, with more than 70% agreeing at week 1 and more than 78% at week 3.


Hydrophobically modified polymers can minimize skin irritation potential caused by surfactant-based cleansers.

Draelos Z, Hornby S, Walters RM, Appa Y - J Cosmet Dermatol (2013)

Participant agreement with statements about cleansing efficacy and makeup removal at week 1 (a) and week 3 (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285286&req=5

fig03: Participant agreement with statements about cleansing efficacy and makeup removal at week 1 (a) and week 3 (b).
Mentions: As part of the study, women were asked to agree or disagree with specific statements about the efficacy of each facial cleanser at the 1- and 3-week time points. As shown in Figure 3, most women agreed with the statements after using the benchmark commercial nonfoaming cleanser or the test foaming facial cleanser for 1 week or 3 weeks. Of note, 80% or more of women agreed with each statement about the effectiveness of the test facial cleanser with HMPs at week 1 and more than 90% agreed at week 3. The majority of women who used the commercial nonfoaming facial cleanser also agreed with each statement, with more than 70% agreeing at week 1 and more than 78% at week 3.

Bottom Line: Clinicians as well as study subjects consistently rated the test cleanser as effective or slightly more effective at improving symptoms than the commercial cleanser, although no significant differences between groups were observed.In addition, subject self-assessments of skin condition and cleansing properties were slightly more improved with the test cleanser than with the commercial cleanser.Both the test foaming cleanser containing HMPs and the commercial nonfoaming cleanser were effective and well accepted by most women in the study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dermatology Consulting Services, High Point, NC, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus