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Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

Origgi FC, König B, Lindholm AK, Mayor D, Pilo P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium.We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans.The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

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Monthly distribution of the number of carcasses of free-ranging house mice collected from a barn and the number positive for F. tularensis, Switzerland, May 2012–June 2013.
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Figure 1: Monthly distribution of the number of carcasses of free-ranging house mice collected from a barn and the number positive for F. tularensis, Switzerland, May 2012–June 2013.

Mentions: Starting in early June 2012, increased numbers of mice were found dead in the barn. During May 2012–June 2013, a total of 69 carcasses were collected and stored frozen until necropsy was performed, beginning in mid-July 2012, after the initial peak of the outbreak (Figure). Full pathologic analysis could be performed on samples from 35/69 mice, of which 15 were PCR-positive for F. tularensis. The primary organs were collected and processed for histologic analysis. Pathologic investigation showed the presence of macroscopic and histologic changes. Skin lesions consistent with bite and fight wounds were observed in 7 mice, 1 of which was PCR-positive for F. tularensis; only gram-positive cocci were detected in the associated skin lesions of this mouse by light microscopy. Splenomegaly was observed in 23 mice. In 12 of these mice, splenomegaly was secondary to tularemia, and in 8, it was associated with amyloidosis and was frequently multisystemic. In 3 mice, splenomegaly was associated with amyloidosis and F. tularensis infection. Red to dark red mottling of the lung was observed in several affected mice, but obvious lung hemorrhages were observed in only 2 mice. The main histologic finding was the presence of multiple foci of necrosis in spleen, liver, and lung. In addition, frequent prominent thrombi and emboli were seen in lungs in association with severe vascular inflammatory infiltration and necrosis.


Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

Origgi FC, König B, Lindholm AK, Mayor D, Pilo P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Monthly distribution of the number of carcasses of free-ranging house mice collected from a barn and the number positive for F. tularensis, Switzerland, May 2012–June 2013.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285241&req=5

Figure 1: Monthly distribution of the number of carcasses of free-ranging house mice collected from a barn and the number positive for F. tularensis, Switzerland, May 2012–June 2013.
Mentions: Starting in early June 2012, increased numbers of mice were found dead in the barn. During May 2012–June 2013, a total of 69 carcasses were collected and stored frozen until necropsy was performed, beginning in mid-July 2012, after the initial peak of the outbreak (Figure). Full pathologic analysis could be performed on samples from 35/69 mice, of which 15 were PCR-positive for F. tularensis. The primary organs were collected and processed for histologic analysis. Pathologic investigation showed the presence of macroscopic and histologic changes. Skin lesions consistent with bite and fight wounds were observed in 7 mice, 1 of which was PCR-positive for F. tularensis; only gram-positive cocci were detected in the associated skin lesions of this mouse by light microscopy. Splenomegaly was observed in 23 mice. In 12 of these mice, splenomegaly was secondary to tularemia, and in 8, it was associated with amyloidosis and was frequently multisystemic. In 3 mice, splenomegaly was associated with amyloidosis and F. tularensis infection. Red to dark red mottling of the lung was observed in several affected mice, but obvious lung hemorrhages were observed in only 2 mice. The main histologic finding was the presence of multiple foci of necrosis in spleen, liver, and lung. In addition, frequent prominent thrombi and emboli were seen in lungs in association with severe vascular inflammatory infiltration and necrosis.

Bottom Line: The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium.We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans.The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus