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Optimal waist circumference cutoff values for the diagnosis of abdominal obesity in korean adults.

Yoon YS, Oh SW - Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: We analyzed the data from two large cohorts using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the incidences of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarct, angina, coronary artery disease, and multiple metabolic risk factors as outcome variables.However, considering the prevalence of abdominal obesity and the health costs for its prevention and management, 90 cm in males and 85 cm in females are probably more appropriate thresholds for abdominal obesity.These values may be modified once better research is performed through prospective studies using representative populations, common health outcomes, and proper analytical approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Abdominal obesity is associated closely with insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Waist circumference (WC) is a useful surrogate marker commonly used for abdominal adiposity. The determination of WC cutoff levels is important in the prevention and treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and related cardiovascular diseases. Recent epidemiological evidence suggested that appropriate optimal cutoffs for Koreans ranged over 80 to 89.8 cm in males and 76.1 to 86.5 cm in females. We analyzed the data from two large cohorts using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the incidences of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarct, angina, coronary artery disease, and multiple metabolic risk factors as outcome variables. Optimal WC cutoff points for Koreans were 85 cm in males and 80 cm in females. However, considering the prevalence of abdominal obesity and the health costs for its prevention and management, 90 cm in males and 85 cm in females are probably more appropriate thresholds for abdominal obesity. These values may be modified once better research is performed through prospective studies using representative populations, common health outcomes, and proper analytical approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hazard ratios for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors or incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the waist circumference. (A) Men, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (B) Women, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (C) Men, diabetes mellitus. (D) Women, diabetes mellitus.
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Figure 1: Hazard ratios for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors or incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the waist circumference. (A) Men, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (B) Women, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (C) Men, diabetes mellitus. (D) Women, diabetes mellitus.

Mentions: We performed a Cox proportional hazard analysis to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) for having metabolic risk factors or an incidence of diabetes for different WC cutoff values. Fig. 1 shows the HRs for the incidences of one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors and for the incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the WC according to the Ansung-Ansan cohort. The risks of having one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors were significantly increased with increasing WC. The HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) from the lowest to the highest 5-cm interval WC category (5-cm interval category from <70 to ≥100 cm) for males were 0.88, 1.00, 1.46, 1.90, 2.34, 2.81, 2.76, and 2.95, respectively, (95% CI, 2.24 to 3.88) for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors; 0.73, 1.00, 1.67, 2.35, 3.15, 4.23, 4.66, and 5.16, respectively, (95% CI, 3.78 to 7.04) for the development of two or more metabolic risk factors; and 0.83, 1.00, 3.31, 5.04, 7.44, 10.76, 13.50, and 12.81, respectively, (95% CI, 7.65 to 21.45) for the development of three or more metabolic risk factors (all P<0.001 for trend). Females displayed similar HR trends for the development of one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors. The HRs for the incidence of diabetes were significantly increased from WC cutoff values of ≥85 cm for males (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.70; P<0.001) and ≥80 cm for females (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.60; P<0.001).


Optimal waist circumference cutoff values for the diagnosis of abdominal obesity in korean adults.

Yoon YS, Oh SW - Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) (2014)

Hazard ratios for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors or incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the waist circumference. (A) Men, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (B) Women, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (C) Men, diabetes mellitus. (D) Women, diabetes mellitus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4285028&req=5

Figure 1: Hazard ratios for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors or incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the waist circumference. (A) Men, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (B) Women, ≥1, 2, or 3 metabolic risk factors. (C) Men, diabetes mellitus. (D) Women, diabetes mellitus.
Mentions: We performed a Cox proportional hazard analysis to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) for having metabolic risk factors or an incidence of diabetes for different WC cutoff values. Fig. 1 shows the HRs for the incidences of one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors and for the incidence of diabetes for a 5-cm increase in the WC according to the Ansung-Ansan cohort. The risks of having one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors were significantly increased with increasing WC. The HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) from the lowest to the highest 5-cm interval WC category (5-cm interval category from <70 to ≥100 cm) for males were 0.88, 1.00, 1.46, 1.90, 2.34, 2.81, 2.76, and 2.95, respectively, (95% CI, 2.24 to 3.88) for the development of one or more metabolic risk factors; 0.73, 1.00, 1.67, 2.35, 3.15, 4.23, 4.66, and 5.16, respectively, (95% CI, 3.78 to 7.04) for the development of two or more metabolic risk factors; and 0.83, 1.00, 3.31, 5.04, 7.44, 10.76, 13.50, and 12.81, respectively, (95% CI, 7.65 to 21.45) for the development of three or more metabolic risk factors (all P<0.001 for trend). Females displayed similar HR trends for the development of one, two, three, or more metabolic risk factors. The HRs for the incidence of diabetes were significantly increased from WC cutoff values of ≥85 cm for males (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.70; P<0.001) and ≥80 cm for females (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.60; P<0.001).

Bottom Line: We analyzed the data from two large cohorts using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the incidences of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarct, angina, coronary artery disease, and multiple metabolic risk factors as outcome variables.However, considering the prevalence of abdominal obesity and the health costs for its prevention and management, 90 cm in males and 85 cm in females are probably more appropriate thresholds for abdominal obesity.These values may be modified once better research is performed through prospective studies using representative populations, common health outcomes, and proper analytical approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Abdominal obesity is associated closely with insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Waist circumference (WC) is a useful surrogate marker commonly used for abdominal adiposity. The determination of WC cutoff levels is important in the prevention and treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and related cardiovascular diseases. Recent epidemiological evidence suggested that appropriate optimal cutoffs for Koreans ranged over 80 to 89.8 cm in males and 76.1 to 86.5 cm in females. We analyzed the data from two large cohorts using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the incidences of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarct, angina, coronary artery disease, and multiple metabolic risk factors as outcome variables. Optimal WC cutoff points for Koreans were 85 cm in males and 80 cm in females. However, considering the prevalence of abdominal obesity and the health costs for its prevention and management, 90 cm in males and 85 cm in females are probably more appropriate thresholds for abdominal obesity. These values may be modified once better research is performed through prospective studies using representative populations, common health outcomes, and proper analytical approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus