Limits...
Differences in life-history and ecological traits between co-occurring Panulirus spiny lobsters (Decapoda, Palinuridae).

Briones-Fourzán P - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: Coexistence of closely related species may be promoted by niche differentiation or result from interspecific trade-offs in life history and ecological traits that influence relative fitness differences and contribute to competitive inequalities.Whether the substantial niche differentiation and apparent interspecific trade-offs between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus relative to Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus reflect an earlier divergence of the former pair of species in the evolution of the genus constitutes an intriguing hypothesis.However, whether or not post-divergence evolution of each species pair occurred in sympatry remains uncertain.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales. Prol. Av. Niños Héroes s/n, Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, México.

ABSTRACT
Coexistence of closely related species may be promoted by niche differentiation or result from interspecific trade-offs in life history and ecological traits that influence relative fitness differences and contribute to competitive inequalities. Although insufficient to prove coexistence, trait comparisons provide a first step to identify functional differences between co-occurring congeneric species in relation to mechanisms of coexistence. Here, a comparative review on life history and ecological traits is presented for two pairs of co-occurring species of spiny lobsters in the genus Panulirus: Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus from the Eastern Central Pacific region, and Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from the Caribbean region. Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus have similar larval, postlarval, and adult sizes and a similar diet, but differ in degree of habitat specialization, fecundity, and growth rate. However, little is known on behavioral traits of these two species that may influence their competitive abilities and susceptibility to predators. The more abundant information on Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus shows that these two species differ more broadly in degree of habitat specialization, larval, postlarval and adult sizes, diet, fecundity, growth rate, degree of sociality, defense mechanisms, susceptibility to predators, and chemical ecology, suggesting a greater degree of niche differentiation between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus than between Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus. Whether the substantial niche differentiation and apparent interspecific trade-offs between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus relative to Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus reflect an earlier divergence of the former pair of species in the evolution of the genus constitutes an intriguing hypothesis. However, whether or not post-divergence evolution of each species pair occurred in sympatry remains uncertain.

No MeSH data available.


Diet of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from Puerto Morelos, Mexico. For each food item the index of relative importance (IRI) is estimated as IRI = (% frequency × % weight)/100. (Data from Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4283377&req=5

Figure 6: Diet of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from Puerto Morelos, Mexico. For each food item the index of relative importance (IRI) is estimated as IRI = (% frequency × % weight)/100. (Data from Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990).

Mentions: The benthic distribution of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus overlaps in the coral reef habitat. In Puerto Morelos, Panulirusguttatus outnumbers Panulirusargus by 5 to 1 across the entire reef habitat, but the relative density of each species varies with reef zone. Thus, the ratio of Panulirusguttatus to Panulirusargus is, on average, 2:1 in the back reef (the protected reef zone facing the mainland), but 16:1 in the fore reef (the exposed reef zone facing the open waters) (Lozano-Álvarez et al. 2007). A numerical dominance of Panulirusguttatus over Panulirusargus on fore reefs has also been reported in Florida (Sharp et al. 1997) and Belize (Acosta and Robertson 2003). However, there is no evidence that Panulirusguttatus can displace Panulirusargus via interference competition because individuals of these congeneric species do not act aggressively toward each other even when in close proximity (Lozano-Álvarez and Briones-Fourzán 2001). Rather, there is evidence that Panulirusguttatus and Panulirusargus make a differential use of reef resources (Lozano-Álvarez et al. 2007). For example, although lobsters of both species feed on a wide variety of organisms with a marked preference for crustaceans and molluscs (Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990) (Fig. 6), interspecific competition for food resources is unlikely, as individuals of Panulirusguttatus forage on the reef itself (Wynne and Côté 2007) whereas reef-dwelling individuals of Panulirusargus forage on seagrass and soft-bottom areas adjacent to the coral reefs (Cox et al. 1997, Briones-Fourzán et al. 2003).


Differences in life-history and ecological traits between co-occurring Panulirus spiny lobsters (Decapoda, Palinuridae).

Briones-Fourzán P - Zookeys (2014)

Diet of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from Puerto Morelos, Mexico. For each food item the index of relative importance (IRI) is estimated as IRI = (% frequency × % weight)/100. (Data from Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4283377&req=5

Figure 6: Diet of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from Puerto Morelos, Mexico. For each food item the index of relative importance (IRI) is estimated as IRI = (% frequency × % weight)/100. (Data from Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990).
Mentions: The benthic distribution of Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus overlaps in the coral reef habitat. In Puerto Morelos, Panulirusguttatus outnumbers Panulirusargus by 5 to 1 across the entire reef habitat, but the relative density of each species varies with reef zone. Thus, the ratio of Panulirusguttatus to Panulirusargus is, on average, 2:1 in the back reef (the protected reef zone facing the mainland), but 16:1 in the fore reef (the exposed reef zone facing the open waters) (Lozano-Álvarez et al. 2007). A numerical dominance of Panulirusguttatus over Panulirusargus on fore reefs has also been reported in Florida (Sharp et al. 1997) and Belize (Acosta and Robertson 2003). However, there is no evidence that Panulirusguttatus can displace Panulirusargus via interference competition because individuals of these congeneric species do not act aggressively toward each other even when in close proximity (Lozano-Álvarez and Briones-Fourzán 2001). Rather, there is evidence that Panulirusguttatus and Panulirusargus make a differential use of reef resources (Lozano-Álvarez et al. 2007). For example, although lobsters of both species feed on a wide variety of organisms with a marked preference for crustaceans and molluscs (Colinas-Sánchez and Briones-Fourzán 1990) (Fig. 6), interspecific competition for food resources is unlikely, as individuals of Panulirusguttatus forage on the reef itself (Wynne and Côté 2007) whereas reef-dwelling individuals of Panulirusargus forage on seagrass and soft-bottom areas adjacent to the coral reefs (Cox et al. 1997, Briones-Fourzán et al. 2003).

Bottom Line: Coexistence of closely related species may be promoted by niche differentiation or result from interspecific trade-offs in life history and ecological traits that influence relative fitness differences and contribute to competitive inequalities.Whether the substantial niche differentiation and apparent interspecific trade-offs between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus relative to Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus reflect an earlier divergence of the former pair of species in the evolution of the genus constitutes an intriguing hypothesis.However, whether or not post-divergence evolution of each species pair occurred in sympatry remains uncertain.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales. Prol. Av. Niños Héroes s/n, Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, México.

ABSTRACT
Coexistence of closely related species may be promoted by niche differentiation or result from interspecific trade-offs in life history and ecological traits that influence relative fitness differences and contribute to competitive inequalities. Although insufficient to prove coexistence, trait comparisons provide a first step to identify functional differences between co-occurring congeneric species in relation to mechanisms of coexistence. Here, a comparative review on life history and ecological traits is presented for two pairs of co-occurring species of spiny lobsters in the genus Panulirus: Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus from the Eastern Central Pacific region, and Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus from the Caribbean region. Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus have similar larval, postlarval, and adult sizes and a similar diet, but differ in degree of habitat specialization, fecundity, and growth rate. However, little is known on behavioral traits of these two species that may influence their competitive abilities and susceptibility to predators. The more abundant information on Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus shows that these two species differ more broadly in degree of habitat specialization, larval, postlarval and adult sizes, diet, fecundity, growth rate, degree of sociality, defense mechanisms, susceptibility to predators, and chemical ecology, suggesting a greater degree of niche differentiation between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus than between Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus. Whether the substantial niche differentiation and apparent interspecific trade-offs between Panulirusargus and Panulirusguttatus relative to Panulirusgracilis and Panulirusinflatus reflect an earlier divergence of the former pair of species in the evolution of the genus constitutes an intriguing hypothesis. However, whether or not post-divergence evolution of each species pair occurred in sympatry remains uncertain.

No MeSH data available.