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Grooming as a secondary behavior in the shrimp Macrobrachiumrosenbergii (Crustacea, Decapoda, Caridea).

VanMaurik LN, Wortham JL - Zookeys (2014)

Bottom Line: The largest and most dominant males, BC males, are predicted to have significantly different grooming behaviors compared to females and the other two male morphotypes.Significant differences in the grooming behaviors of all individuals (females and male morphotypes) were found.Overall, grooming behaviors were found to be a secondary behavior which only occurred when primary behaviors such as mating, feeding or fighting were not present.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology.

ABSTRACT
The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachiumrosenbergii, is a large shrimp extensively used in aquaculture whose grooming behaviors were analyzed in this study. Macrobrachiumrosenbergii exhibits three unique male morphotypes that differ in their behavior, morphology and physiology: small-clawed males (SM), orange-clawed males (OC) and blue-clawed males (BC). The largest and most dominant males, BC males, are predicted to have significantly different grooming behaviors compared to females and the other two male morphotypes. These BC males may be too large and bulky to efficiently groom and may dedicate more time to mating and agonistic interactions than grooming behaviors. Observations were conducted to look at the prevalence of grooming behaviors in the absence and presence of conspecifics and to determine if any differences in grooming behavior exist among the sexes and male morphotypes. Significant differences in the grooming behaviors of all individuals (females and male morphotypes) were found. BC males tended to have the highest grooming time budget (percent of time spent grooming) while SM males had a relatively low grooming time budget. The grooming behaviors of the male morphotypes differed, indicating while these males play distinct, separate roles in the social hierarchy, they also have different grooming priorities. The conditions in which Macrobrachiumrosenbergii are cultured may result in increased body fouling, which may vary, depending on the grooming efficiencies and priorities of these male morphotypes. Overall, grooming behaviors were found to be a secondary behavior which only occurred when primary behaviors such as mating, feeding or fighting were not present.

No MeSH data available.


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Relative size of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii female and male morphotypes. A Female B Small-clawed (SM) male C Orange-clawed (OC) male D Blue-clawed (BC) male. Note the difference in the size of the chelipeds.
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Figure 2: Relative size of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii female and male morphotypes. A Female B Small-clawed (SM) male C Orange-clawed (OC) male D Blue-clawed (BC) male. Note the difference in the size of the chelipeds.

Mentions: Agonistic behaviors and social structure of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii have been extensively studied due to its use in aquaculture (Barki et al. 1991, Kuris et al. 1987, Ra’anan and Sagi 1985). This species has three distinct male morphotypes, which differ in morphology, physiology and behavior (Ra’anan and Sagi 1985, Kuris et al. 1987, Sagi and Ra’anan 1988) (Figure 2). The smallest males (SM) have small claws and are subordinate and non-territorial. The intermediate orange-clawed males (OC) are subdominant to the larger males and larger in body size and cheliped (second pereopod) length than SM males. The largest and dominant males in the population are the blue-clawed males (BC). These male morphotypes form a social hierarchy in the population and may be found within the same age class (i.e. all three morphotypes belong to the same cohort) (Kuris et al. 1987, Govind and Pearce 1993).


Grooming as a secondary behavior in the shrimp Macrobrachiumrosenbergii (Crustacea, Decapoda, Caridea).

VanMaurik LN, Wortham JL - Zookeys (2014)

Relative size of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii female and male morphotypes. A Female B Small-clawed (SM) male C Orange-clawed (OC) male D Blue-clawed (BC) male. Note the difference in the size of the chelipeds.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4283365&req=5

Figure 2: Relative size of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii female and male morphotypes. A Female B Small-clawed (SM) male C Orange-clawed (OC) male D Blue-clawed (BC) male. Note the difference in the size of the chelipeds.
Mentions: Agonistic behaviors and social structure of Macrobrachiumrosenbergii have been extensively studied due to its use in aquaculture (Barki et al. 1991, Kuris et al. 1987, Ra’anan and Sagi 1985). This species has three distinct male morphotypes, which differ in morphology, physiology and behavior (Ra’anan and Sagi 1985, Kuris et al. 1987, Sagi and Ra’anan 1988) (Figure 2). The smallest males (SM) have small claws and are subordinate and non-territorial. The intermediate orange-clawed males (OC) are subdominant to the larger males and larger in body size and cheliped (second pereopod) length than SM males. The largest and dominant males in the population are the blue-clawed males (BC). These male morphotypes form a social hierarchy in the population and may be found within the same age class (i.e. all three morphotypes belong to the same cohort) (Kuris et al. 1987, Govind and Pearce 1993).

Bottom Line: The largest and most dominant males, BC males, are predicted to have significantly different grooming behaviors compared to females and the other two male morphotypes.Significant differences in the grooming behaviors of all individuals (females and male morphotypes) were found.Overall, grooming behaviors were found to be a secondary behavior which only occurred when primary behaviors such as mating, feeding or fighting were not present.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of South Florida, Department of Integrative Biology.

ABSTRACT
The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachiumrosenbergii, is a large shrimp extensively used in aquaculture whose grooming behaviors were analyzed in this study. Macrobrachiumrosenbergii exhibits three unique male morphotypes that differ in their behavior, morphology and physiology: small-clawed males (SM), orange-clawed males (OC) and blue-clawed males (BC). The largest and most dominant males, BC males, are predicted to have significantly different grooming behaviors compared to females and the other two male morphotypes. These BC males may be too large and bulky to efficiently groom and may dedicate more time to mating and agonistic interactions than grooming behaviors. Observations were conducted to look at the prevalence of grooming behaviors in the absence and presence of conspecifics and to determine if any differences in grooming behavior exist among the sexes and male morphotypes. Significant differences in the grooming behaviors of all individuals (females and male morphotypes) were found. BC males tended to have the highest grooming time budget (percent of time spent grooming) while SM males had a relatively low grooming time budget. The grooming behaviors of the male morphotypes differed, indicating while these males play distinct, separate roles in the social hierarchy, they also have different grooming priorities. The conditions in which Macrobrachiumrosenbergii are cultured may result in increased body fouling, which may vary, depending on the grooming efficiencies and priorities of these male morphotypes. Overall, grooming behaviors were found to be a secondary behavior which only occurred when primary behaviors such as mating, feeding or fighting were not present.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus