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Nanotechnology in meat processing and packaging: potential applications - a review.

Ramachandraiah K, Han SG, Chin KB - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The potential benefits of utilizing nanomaterials in food are improved bioavailability, antimicrobial effects, enhanced sensory acceptance and targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.However, challenges exist in the application of nanomaterials due to knowledge gaps in the production of ingredients such as nanopowders, stability of delivery systems in meat products and health risks caused by the same properties which also offer the benefits.So far, the most promising area for nanotechnology application seems to be in meat packaging, but the long term effects on human health and environment due to migration of the nanomaterials from the packaging needs to be studied further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, College of Animal Bioscience and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Korea .

ABSTRACT
Growing demand for sustainable production, increasing competition and consideration of health concerns have led the meat industries on a path to innovation. Meat industries across the world are focusing on the development of novel meat products and processes to meet consumer demand. Hence, a process innovation, like nanotechnology, can have a significant impact on the meat processing industry through the development of not only novel functional meat products, but also novel packaging for the products. The potential benefits of utilizing nanomaterials in food are improved bioavailability, antimicrobial effects, enhanced sensory acceptance and targeted delivery of bioactive compounds. However, challenges exist in the application of nanomaterials due to knowledge gaps in the production of ingredients such as nanopowders, stability of delivery systems in meat products and health risks caused by the same properties which also offer the benefits. For the success of nanotechnology in meat products, challenges in public acceptance, economics and the regulation of food processed with nanomaterials which may have the potential to persist, accumulate and lead to toxicity need to be addressed. So far, the most promising area for nanotechnology application seems to be in meat packaging, but the long term effects on human health and environment due to migration of the nanomaterials from the packaging needs to be studied further. The future of nanotechnology in meat products depends on the roles played by governments, regulatory agencies and manufacturers in addressing the challenges related to the application of nanomaterials in food.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Application matrix of nanotechnology in food science and technology (adapted from Moraru et al. [2003]).
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f1-ajas-28-2-290: Application matrix of nanotechnology in food science and technology (adapted from Moraru et al. [2003]).

Mentions: Nanotechnology is projected to impact the food industry mainly through the creation of nano-sized materials with novel properties, the development of novel processing methods, products and improvements in food safety and biosecurity as shown in Figure 1 (Moraru et al., 2003; 2009). Strategies for the application of nanomaterials in food may be different from those employed in traditional nanotechnology (Weiss et al., 2006). Nevertheless, due to the novel properties exhibited by nanomaterials, significant beneficial changes are expected to be enabled in the production, packaging and distribution of many food products, including meat products (Weiss et al., 2006; Duncan, 2011; Gruère, 2012). On the other hand, this novel technology may also have the potential to cause risks to human health and the environment due to the same properties which offered its benefits (O’Brien and Cummins, 2010; Chaudhry and Castle, 2011). The perception of such risks and benefits may influence the acceptance to consumers of using this technology (Troy and Kerry, 2010). This review focuses on the types of nanomaterials, delivery systems and the risks associated with nanomaterials in areas of meat processing and packaging.


Nanotechnology in meat processing and packaging: potential applications - a review.

Ramachandraiah K, Han SG, Chin KB - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2015)

Application matrix of nanotechnology in food science and technology (adapted from Moraru et al. [2003]).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4283176&req=5

f1-ajas-28-2-290: Application matrix of nanotechnology in food science and technology (adapted from Moraru et al. [2003]).
Mentions: Nanotechnology is projected to impact the food industry mainly through the creation of nano-sized materials with novel properties, the development of novel processing methods, products and improvements in food safety and biosecurity as shown in Figure 1 (Moraru et al., 2003; 2009). Strategies for the application of nanomaterials in food may be different from those employed in traditional nanotechnology (Weiss et al., 2006). Nevertheless, due to the novel properties exhibited by nanomaterials, significant beneficial changes are expected to be enabled in the production, packaging and distribution of many food products, including meat products (Weiss et al., 2006; Duncan, 2011; Gruère, 2012). On the other hand, this novel technology may also have the potential to cause risks to human health and the environment due to the same properties which offered its benefits (O’Brien and Cummins, 2010; Chaudhry and Castle, 2011). The perception of such risks and benefits may influence the acceptance to consumers of using this technology (Troy and Kerry, 2010). This review focuses on the types of nanomaterials, delivery systems and the risks associated with nanomaterials in areas of meat processing and packaging.

Bottom Line: The potential benefits of utilizing nanomaterials in food are improved bioavailability, antimicrobial effects, enhanced sensory acceptance and targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.However, challenges exist in the application of nanomaterials due to knowledge gaps in the production of ingredients such as nanopowders, stability of delivery systems in meat products and health risks caused by the same properties which also offer the benefits.So far, the most promising area for nanotechnology application seems to be in meat packaging, but the long term effects on human health and environment due to migration of the nanomaterials from the packaging needs to be studied further.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, College of Animal Bioscience and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Korea .

ABSTRACT
Growing demand for sustainable production, increasing competition and consideration of health concerns have led the meat industries on a path to innovation. Meat industries across the world are focusing on the development of novel meat products and processes to meet consumer demand. Hence, a process innovation, like nanotechnology, can have a significant impact on the meat processing industry through the development of not only novel functional meat products, but also novel packaging for the products. The potential benefits of utilizing nanomaterials in food are improved bioavailability, antimicrobial effects, enhanced sensory acceptance and targeted delivery of bioactive compounds. However, challenges exist in the application of nanomaterials due to knowledge gaps in the production of ingredients such as nanopowders, stability of delivery systems in meat products and health risks caused by the same properties which also offer the benefits. For the success of nanotechnology in meat products, challenges in public acceptance, economics and the regulation of food processed with nanomaterials which may have the potential to persist, accumulate and lead to toxicity need to be addressed. So far, the most promising area for nanotechnology application seems to be in meat packaging, but the long term effects on human health and environment due to migration of the nanomaterials from the packaging needs to be studied further. The future of nanotechnology in meat products depends on the roles played by governments, regulatory agencies and manufacturers in addressing the challenges related to the application of nanomaterials in food.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus