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Low-dose calcium supplementation for preventing pre-eclampsia: a systematic review and commentary.

Hofmeyr GJ, Belizán JM, von Dadelszen P, Calcium and Pre-eclampsia (CAP) Study Gro - BJOG (2014)

Bottom Line: Epidemiological data link low dietary calcium with pre-eclampsia.This is problematic logistically in low-resource settings; excessive calcium may be harmful; and 20 weeks may be too late to alter outcomes.To review the impact of lower dose calcium supplementation on pre-eclampsia risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Effective Care Research Unit, East London Hospital Complex/University of the Witwatersrand/University of Fort Hare, East London, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

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Flow diagram of study selection.
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fig01: Flow diagram of study selection.

Mentions: The PubMed search (17 September 2012) identified 201 papers, and the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register identified 51 trials, of which nine met the criteria for inclusion in this review (Figure1). One trial included a comparison that met our primary inclusion criteria (low risk of bias, low-dose calcium compared with no calcium).11 Both groups from this trial included in the review received low-dose aspirin as a co-intervention. Six trials did not report adequate allocation concealment strategies (high risk of bias), of which three used calcium alone12–14 and two used calcium plus Vitamin D.15,16 One trial with low risk of bias used calcium plus antioxidants17 and two trials with low risk of bias used calcium plus linoleic acid.18,19


Low-dose calcium supplementation for preventing pre-eclampsia: a systematic review and commentary.

Hofmeyr GJ, Belizán JM, von Dadelszen P, Calcium and Pre-eclampsia (CAP) Study Gro - BJOG (2014)

Flow diagram of study selection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4282055&req=5

fig01: Flow diagram of study selection.
Mentions: The PubMed search (17 September 2012) identified 201 papers, and the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register identified 51 trials, of which nine met the criteria for inclusion in this review (Figure1). One trial included a comparison that met our primary inclusion criteria (low risk of bias, low-dose calcium compared with no calcium).11 Both groups from this trial included in the review received low-dose aspirin as a co-intervention. Six trials did not report adequate allocation concealment strategies (high risk of bias), of which three used calcium alone12–14 and two used calcium plus Vitamin D.15,16 One trial with low risk of bias used calcium plus antioxidants17 and two trials with low risk of bias used calcium plus linoleic acid.18,19

Bottom Line: Epidemiological data link low dietary calcium with pre-eclampsia.This is problematic logistically in low-resource settings; excessive calcium may be harmful; and 20 weeks may be too late to alter outcomes.To review the impact of lower dose calcium supplementation on pre-eclampsia risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Effective Care Research Unit, East London Hospital Complex/University of the Witwatersrand/University of Fort Hare, East London, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus