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Speech perception and production by sequential bilingual children: a longitudinal study of voice onset time acquisition.

McCarthy KM, Mahon M, Rosen S, Evans BG - Child Dev (2014)

Bottom Line: This is typically referred to as sequential bilingualism.Children were tested twice: when they were in nursery (52-month-olds) and 1 year later.Sequential bilinguals' perception and production of English plosives were initially driven by their experience with their L1, but after starting school, changed to match that of their monolingual peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London.

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Box plots of monolingual and bilingual children's phoneme boundary (voice onset time, milliseconds) for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/. The white boxes represent Time 1 and the gray boxes represent Time 2. The black dots represent individual data points. The dashed gray line represents the adult monolingual English mean boundary.
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fig03: Box plots of monolingual and bilingual children's phoneme boundary (voice onset time, milliseconds) for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/. The white boxes represent Time 1 and the gray boxes represent Time 2. The black dots represent individual data points. The dashed gray line represents the adult monolingual English mean boundary.

Mentions: Figure3 shows the children's phoneme boundary for /p/-/b/ (Time 1 mean, monolingual = 31 ms, bilingual = 30 ms; Time 2 mean, monolingual = 24 ms, bilingual = 27 ms) and /k/-/g/ (Time 1 mean, monolingual = 40 ms, bilingual = 43 ms; Time 2 mean, monolingual = 49 ms, bilingual = 48 ms). LMM analyses revealed a significant three-way interaction between group, contrast and time, F(3, 113) = 6.06, p = .001, and a main effect of contrast, F(1, 112) = 168.10, p < .001. All other main effects were not significant (p > .05). Sequential Sidak post hoc tests revealed that /p/-/b/ had a significantly shorter phoneme boundary than /k/-/g/ (p < .05), and overall there was no significant difference between the monolinguals and bilinguals (p > .05). The monolinguals, however, displayed a significant shift in phoneme boundary from Time 1 to Time 2 for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/ such that they were closer to that of the adult target (p < .05), whereas the bilinguals showed no significant difference between Time 1 and Time 2 (p > .05).


Speech perception and production by sequential bilingual children: a longitudinal study of voice onset time acquisition.

McCarthy KM, Mahon M, Rosen S, Evans BG - Child Dev (2014)

Box plots of monolingual and bilingual children's phoneme boundary (voice onset time, milliseconds) for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/. The white boxes represent Time 1 and the gray boxes represent Time 2. The black dots represent individual data points. The dashed gray line represents the adult monolingual English mean boundary.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4282029&req=5

fig03: Box plots of monolingual and bilingual children's phoneme boundary (voice onset time, milliseconds) for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/. The white boxes represent Time 1 and the gray boxes represent Time 2. The black dots represent individual data points. The dashed gray line represents the adult monolingual English mean boundary.
Mentions: Figure3 shows the children's phoneme boundary for /p/-/b/ (Time 1 mean, monolingual = 31 ms, bilingual = 30 ms; Time 2 mean, monolingual = 24 ms, bilingual = 27 ms) and /k/-/g/ (Time 1 mean, monolingual = 40 ms, bilingual = 43 ms; Time 2 mean, monolingual = 49 ms, bilingual = 48 ms). LMM analyses revealed a significant three-way interaction between group, contrast and time, F(3, 113) = 6.06, p = .001, and a main effect of contrast, F(1, 112) = 168.10, p < .001. All other main effects were not significant (p > .05). Sequential Sidak post hoc tests revealed that /p/-/b/ had a significantly shorter phoneme boundary than /k/-/g/ (p < .05), and overall there was no significant difference between the monolinguals and bilinguals (p > .05). The monolinguals, however, displayed a significant shift in phoneme boundary from Time 1 to Time 2 for /p/-/b/ and /k/-/g/ such that they were closer to that of the adult target (p < .05), whereas the bilinguals showed no significant difference between Time 1 and Time 2 (p > .05).

Bottom Line: This is typically referred to as sequential bilingualism.Children were tested twice: when they were in nursery (52-month-olds) and 1 year later.Sequential bilinguals' perception and production of English plosives were initially driven by their experience with their L1, but after starting school, changed to match that of their monolingual peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London.

Show MeSH