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Genotyping cell-free tumor DNA in the blood to detect residual disease and drug resistance.

Siravegna G, Bardelli A - Genome Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood can be used to generate molecular profiles of tumors.Non-invasive 'liquid biopsies' can be used to monitor minimal residual disease and detect the emergence of drug resistance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood can be used to generate molecular profiles of tumors. Non-invasive 'liquid biopsies' can be used to monitor minimal residual disease and detect the emergence of drug resistance.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical applications of cell-free DNA analysis. cfDNA can be used in (1) diagnosis (2,3) to detect residual disease after surgery, (4) to monitor the response to therapy and (5) follow-up, and (6) to detect resistance. cfDNA, cell-free DNA; CTC, circulating tumor cells.
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Fig2: Clinical applications of cell-free DNA analysis. cfDNA can be used in (1) diagnosis (2,3) to detect residual disease after surgery, (4) to monitor the response to therapy and (5) follow-up, and (6) to detect resistance. cfDNA, cell-free DNA; CTC, circulating tumor cells.

Mentions: Any tumor-specific molecular alteration can be detected in the blood of patients with cancer, and profiling of cfDNAs from plasma or serum has been proposed for several clinical applications (FigureĀ 2), the most promising of which we discuss in the following sections.Figure 2


Genotyping cell-free tumor DNA in the blood to detect residual disease and drug resistance.

Siravegna G, Bardelli A - Genome Biol. (2014)

Clinical applications of cell-free DNA analysis. cfDNA can be used in (1) diagnosis (2,3) to detect residual disease after surgery, (4) to monitor the response to therapy and (5) follow-up, and (6) to detect resistance. cfDNA, cell-free DNA; CTC, circulating tumor cells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4281953&req=5

Fig2: Clinical applications of cell-free DNA analysis. cfDNA can be used in (1) diagnosis (2,3) to detect residual disease after surgery, (4) to monitor the response to therapy and (5) follow-up, and (6) to detect resistance. cfDNA, cell-free DNA; CTC, circulating tumor cells.
Mentions: Any tumor-specific molecular alteration can be detected in the blood of patients with cancer, and profiling of cfDNAs from plasma or serum has been proposed for several clinical applications (FigureĀ 2), the most promising of which we discuss in the following sections.Figure 2

Bottom Line: DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood can be used to generate molecular profiles of tumors.Non-invasive 'liquid biopsies' can be used to monitor minimal residual disease and detect the emergence of drug resistance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood can be used to generate molecular profiles of tumors. Non-invasive 'liquid biopsies' can be used to monitor minimal residual disease and detect the emergence of drug resistance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus